Archives

Commentary

If you want to understand why North Carolina continues to struggle to fund the basic public services that provide a framework for a middle class society, check out the following graphic. As it demonstrates, even with the much ballyhooed bumps in spending contained in the House budget proposal, the state would still be spending less than it did before the Great Recession — a point at which public investments were already anemic in many critical areas.  And, of course, inadequate as it is, the House proposal is already being dismissed by members of the Senate and their Tea Partying allies as overly generous. The bottom line message from the power-that-be for their fellow North Carolinians : The pain will continue until morale improves.

House budget

Commentary

The reviews are coming in as more and more people wade through the details of the House budget proposal. Here’s another sobering take from the executive director of NC Child:

Tiny plates and the House budget
By Michelle Hughes, Executive Director of NC Child

One of the most simplistic reheated bits of diet advice ever sold in the grocery checkout line is to eat your regular food, but to use a small plate and a small fork.

You’ll think your plate is full!! If you go back for seconds you won’t overeat so much!

Really?

The latest state budget for children’s services seems to have a few similar beliefs baked in–the key one being that before long you’ll believe that the plate in front of you is a regular-sized plate. Even though plates on your right and left are normal, you will not notice the one in front of you is small. Substitute ”appropriation” for “plate” and you get the point.

Set the budget table with tiny plates for many children’s programs and there you have the post-recession and post-2013 tax cut reality. The legislature fundamentally re-set the state’s budget priorities with tax cuts in 2013 and funding has not reached pre-recession levels since, although the state has grown in population and investment needs.

For instance, North Carolina’s premiere early childhood education programs, Smart Start and NC Pre-K, saw their funding reduced by 20% during the recession and have never seen that funding restored. Now, despite a growing population of children, we’re able to provide fewer of them with the strong start they need. Read More

News

House lawmakers unveiled their 2015-17 biennial budget Thursday morning—and education proposals were longer on policy pitches than big figure changes, including measures that would affect student assessment & classroom staffing models as well as seven different pilot programs aimed at teacher preparation, workforce development and remediation, among other ideas.

The budget also did not include a much anticipated announcement on teacher pay — that’s to come at the beginning of next week.

Read on for a list of highlights.

K-12 House Budget

School vouchers: Provided the Supreme Court allows the Opportunity Scholarships program to proceed, which provides students with state funds to attend private schools, House lawmakers propose a $6.8 million increase for 2015-16—bringing the annual cost of program to $17.6 million

Disability vouchers: Students with disabilities would be able to use up to $8,000 state funds annually to attend private schools—that’s up from $6,000 annually in prior years. Families could also get tuition funds up front versus having to wait for reimbursement.

Teacher assistants: Lawmakers added $88.9 million compared to the base each year — but the move is just to backfill the loss in lottery receipts and other nonrecurring funds. So the takeaway is that there’s no real change here–funding levels remain the same as ’14-15.

Textbooks & digital resources: $50 million (for textbooks) compared to the base each year, with a cumulative increase during the biennium of $100 million. Textbook funding has been obliterated in recent years. Read More

Uncategorized

ICYMI, Keith Larson of WBT radio in Charlotte has an entertaining post in the Charlotte Observer on the House lottery scheme entitled “Some of the nuttiest words I’ve typed in 12 years here.” As Larson notes:

“House Republicans want to give teachers their raise by doubling the advertising budget for the so-called Education Lottery. Yes, I actually typed those words. They are some of the most downright nutty words to come my way in 12 years here but they are true. And you actually did just read them. If they are not some of the most downright nutty words you’ve ever read, then you’re reading really funny stuff.

Read More

Uncategorized

The House plan to fund teacher raises with increased lottery revenues continues to meet with widespread derision. ICYMI, the Greensboro News & Record weighed in over the weekend:

“When it comes to raising teacher pay, the state House has almost trumped the Senate for bad ideas.

The Senate offers 11 percent salary hikes, on average, but only for teachers who surrender tenure rights. And about half of the money comes from laying off thousands of teacher assistants.

The House provides 5 percent raises with no strings attached and without eliminating teacher assistants. Unfortunately, to pay for it, the House bets that the state lottery can pull in an additional $106 million next year. To make that happen, it authorizes the Lottery Commission to double its spending on advertising.

What a lesson for our children.

The trouble is, the lottery appeals most strongly to people who can least afford to pay. Furthermore, it provides an unreliable revenue stream. When North Carolina’s participation in a state lottery was debated in 2005, opponents used both arguments. And nearly all Republicans in the legislature voted against it. But Democrats were in the majority then, and they enacted the lottery.

Now, not only do Republican House leaders aim to rely on lottery revenue to fund an ongoing obligation — teacher salaries — they want to drum up more of it….”

Read the rest of the editorial by clicking here.