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NC Budget and Tax Center

The author of this post is Jelicia Diggs, an intern with the NC Budget and Tax Center

Comprehensive immigration reform will result in revenue gain for states, according to an economic and a fiscal analysis prepared by the Congressional Budget Office on the Senate Immigration reform measure last week. CBO projects that this bill will increase the labor force and expand the American economy by increasing the number of non-citizens allowed to lawfully enter the United States on both temporary and permanent bases.

Immigrants play an essential role in sustaining the economy of North Carolina, and currently comprise nearly 10 percent of the state’s work force. With the adoption of this bill, North Carolina, along with the rest of the U.S., will see economic gains. These gains will outweigh the costs anticipated from the expanded eligibility for public services. Read More

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In case you missed it over the weekend, Raleigh’s News & Observer had an encouraging story in the Sunday edition. This is the summary from the good folks at Uniting NC:

Today’s N&O includes a great story about Uniting NC’s most recent volunteer day.

Last Saturday we continued our series of service events  bringing together immigrants and non-immigrants to give back to their community. And again we had lots of great volunteers looking to lend a hand. This time we had over 30 volunteers from 10 different countries.

We sometimes hear cynics tell us that people are coming to the U.S. looking for handouts. They emphasize costs without considering contributions. But have they ever met the people they’re talking about? Read More

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Immigrant rightsThe following post comes to us from Hector Vaca, Charlotte Director of the progressive advocacy group, Action NC:

“Now hear this!  A People’s platform opposing HB 786, the RECLAIM NC Act

In the last few weeks, I’ve worked with community leaders and members of our organization, Action NC, and various partner groups around the state, to hold community forums in Spanish about House Bill 786, the “RECLAIM NC” Act, being considered now in the state legislature. In the forums, our organizations and lawyers shared information about exactly what is included in each section of the bill.  But the main goal of the workshops was to hear from immigrant communities directly THEIR thoughts and opinions on the bill. Participants had a variety of ways to express their views about these issues, including group discussion, Q&A and interactive activities like voting on various provisions as harmful or beneficial.

By now, forums have happened all over the state, from Hendersonville to Burgaw, from Charlotte to Durham, from Greenville to Siler City, from Raleigh to Raeford, and other towns, too. There have been at least 18 workshops in all. The sizes of forums ranged from 15 participants to 120 or more. More than 750 immigrant community members have participated in total.  This is no small accomplishment, and it means, to us at Action NC, that the immigrant community is discussing the bill in some detail, and here’s what they are saying: Read More

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The good folks at the Immigration Policy Center and the American immigration Council have released newly updated state-by-state fact sheets with accompanying infographics that highlight the demographic and economic impact of New Americans, Asians and Latinos in each state. This is from the introduction to the North Carolina page:

“Immigrants, Latinos, and Asians account for growing shares of the economy and population in the electoral swing state of North Carolina. Immigrants (the foreign-born) make up 7.3% of the state’s population, while more than 1 in 10 North Carolinians are Latino or Asian. Moreover, Latinos and Asians wield $22.9 billion in consumer purchasing power. At last count, businesses owned by Latinos and Asians had sales and receipts of $10.1 billion and employed more than 63,000 people. At a time when the economy is still recovering, North Carolina can ill-afford to alienate such a critical component of its labor force, tax base, and business community.”

Click here to view the very cool and informative infographic.

 

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The good people at Imagine 2050, a group committed to making America’s increasingly diverse and multi-racial society work for everyone have posted a report on the cookie-cutter legislation passed last week by the House that seeks to respond to the imaginary threat of “Sharia law.”  

The post also reports that the troubled characters behind the movement to pass such bills into law around the country by the American Laws for American Courts initiative (ALAC):

“Some news outlets and blogs have even mentioned the bill’s roots in the ALAC model. Equally, or perhaps more, important is this bill’s link to the original ALAC author, David Yerushalmi, an anti-Muslim activist and lawyer with a record of extremist rhetoric and questionable ties. Read More