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House Speaker Thom Tillis is sending messages that today’s rollout of a report by the House Select Committee on the State’s Role in Immigration Policy will not be the kind of thing that will please the far right anti-immigrant crowd. Let’s hope that’s the case.

Meanwhile, folks at the We Are NC coalition issued the following statement yesterday afternoon in anticipation of today’s meeting:

“It has been a very eventful year since the Select Committee on the State’s Role in Immigration Policy’s first hearing, where Representative Iler promised to take a “dispassionate” look at immigration in North Carolina with the results to be outlined in a report released tomorrow.

After hearing from government representatives, the committee now knows that undocumented immigrants enjoy no privilege in their status. Read More

The immigration debate in the United States has seen some modest, incremental progress in recent months — most notably the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program. The Los Angeles Times has a good editorial on this topic over the weekend and we had a post here at The Progressive Pulse last Friday that provides more details for young people who may be eligible.

And then there’s the anti-immigrant crowd. For some time now, two of the noisiest groups in this camp in North Carolina are the groups known as ALIPAC and NC FIRE. Despite giving voice to a lot of incredibly mean-spirited and downright absurd stuff, these groups helped play host recently in Wilmington to a small group of politicians and activists — some of them prominent (Congressman Mike McIntyre) and some of them just narrow-minded and crazy.  You can watch some video of the event by clicking here.

Looks like we still have a ways to go in bridging the gap in this debate.

Cross-posted from Think Progress:

By Ian Millhiser

Yesteday, the Supreme Court handed down a 5-3 decision striking down three key provisions of Arizona’s SB 1070 law, and effectively limiting the scope of the law’s “show me your papers” provision requiring law enforcement officers to determine the immigration status of anyone they have “reasonable suspicion” to believe is in the country illegally. Here are four key takeaways from this decision:

1. Arizona Does Not Get To Have Its Own Immigration Policy: For decades the backbone of American immigration law has been an understanding that the United States has one immigration policy set by our national government, not fifty different immigration policies set by fifty different states. Today’s decision leaves this basic framework in place. In the words of Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion, “[i]t is fundamental that foreign countries concerned about the status, safety, and security of their nationals in the United States must be able to confer and communicate on this subject with one national sovereign, not the 50 separate States.”

2. Arizona Cannot Create New Crimes Targeting Immigrants: Read More

More than one in six small business owners in the United States is an immigrant, according to a new report from the Fiscal Policy Institute’s Immigration Research Initiative.

Seems unlikely that Speaker Tillis discussed this information yesterday when he took time out of his schedule on one of the legislative sesssion’s busiest days to meet with representatives of far right, immigrant-bashing groups.

The U.S. Department of Justice has informed the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts that North Carolina’s failure to provide court interpreters Title VI of the U.S. Code.

This is from a letter from the U.S. Department of Justice to the state that was released this afternoon:

“We write to report the findings of the Civil Rights Division’s investigation of the North Carolina Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC), an office within the North Carolina Judicial Department. As the enclosed findings report explains, we have determined after a comprehensive investigation that the AOC’s policies and practices discriminate on the basis of national origin, in violation of federal law, by failing to provide limited English proficient (LEP) individuals with meaningful access to state court proceedings and operations.”

The letter also informs the state that the cost of meeting its obligations in this area would be relatively small (about $1.4 million) and gives North Carolina three weeks to get about the business of complying.

More information shortly.