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ThanksgivingIf you’re preparing for the inevitable political discussions that will accompany your family get-togethers this week, here are three new Thanksgiving-themed posts that might help you out:

#1 is today’s Fitzsimon File, which highlights the hypocritical change of heart that so many conservative politicians display toward people in need around the holidays. As Chris notes, the disconnect between what the politicians say about the same needy people during the holidays and the other 11 months of the years is frequently breathtaking.

#2 is a new Q&A from the N.C. Budget and Tax Center entitled “How to talk about the economy and taxes with your family.” Here’s an example:

WHEN THEY SAY: “This state is spending more than ever on public education.”

YOU SAY: We’re funding public schools in NC nearly 6 percent less than in 2008 when you adjust for how much things cost.  This would be like the Panthers claiming a touchdown at the 6 yard line.

As the economy improves—and it is improving—we need to invest in our public schools to ensure that we educate our kids and build a sound foundation for future economic growth. Without investing more, we can’t ensure that our classrooms, teachers and students have the cutting-edge tools to improve learning.

Finally, #3 is this morning’s edition of the Weekly Briefing (“Food for thought on the immigration question”) in which several key facts are spelled out (and myths exposed) about President Obama’s executive order on immigration last week. For example: Read More

News

President Barack Obama’s plan to sidestep Congress and order his own action on immigration,  sparing as many as 5 million people from deportation is drawing a mixed response:

mc-1“With this latest executive order, President Obama is making new law by bypassing Congress. I’m already discussing with other governors a long-term solution to immigration reform as well as an appropriate legal response to this unconstitutional overreach of the White House. North Carolina is not a border state, but it’s impacted by illegal immigration. I’m extremely concerned about the potentially negative impact of this executive order on our public schools, health services and public safety.”
Governor Pat McCrory

 

mary-meg-mccarthy“We are relieved and grateful that President Obama finally has kept his promise to address our broken immigration system and relieve the fear of permanent exile and family separation that has plagued immigrants and American families. With this temporary relief, parents of U.S. citizen and lawful permanent resident children, as well as adults who have been raised and educated in our communities, will have the opportunity to pursue their educations, open businesses, advance their careers, and continue to contribute to our cities and economy. The president’s plan will help restore some stability to American families, neighborhoods, schools, and businesses that have struggled in recent years as the government has detained and deported people at a record pace. While the president’s program is a step in the right direction, we regret that it still excludes many parents and other individuals who have deep roots in U.S. communities. We will continue to encourage Congress to fulfill its obligation to create a permanent solution that makes our immigration system more humane and functional for everyone.”
National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) Executive Director Mary Meg McCarthy

 

burr“Tonight the President announced his intention to pursue amnesty for illegal immigrants through executive action. This decision, counter to his own statements over the last few years, represents the very height of Presidential arrogance and signifies a dangerous shift from a nation of laws to a nation of men. In order to achieve some sort of gain for his political party, the President risks damage to the rule of law in our nation, but he also threatens a more immediate impact on those here legally, those following the legal process to gain entry into our country, and others struggling to find work in a fragile economy. Our border states will also be further stressed as they deal with another, almost certain surge of additional illegal immigrants looking for similar treatment from this White House.”
– U.S. Senator Richard Burr (R-NC)

 Price“After two years of failed promises and delay tactics from Speaker Boehner and House Republicans, the time has come for decisive action to fix our broken immigration system. The cost of inaction has simply become too great. Republicans who have criticized the administration would be wise to consult their history books. Every President since Eisenhower has exercised Executive authority on immigration, including five Republicans. Arguing that President Obama’s actions are unconstitutional is both false and disingenuous.

“That said, the President’s action is limited in scope and should not be interpreted as a substitute for congressional action – in fact, the administration has strongly encouraged the House and Senate to pass a comprehensive reform bill that would supersede the Executive Order and deal with the full range of immigration challenges. I hope my Republican colleagues will heed this call.

“We must always remember that we are a nation of immigrants, and I commend the President for using his Executive authority to correct broken immigration policies that have persisted for too long and are doing our country great damage. My hope is that this action will at long last break the partisan logjam and allow for real progress on comprehensive immigration reform.” – Congressman David Price (D-NC)

News

Commentary

Asian Americans and Latinos are the fastest growing minority groups in the country. Particularly in North Carolina, Asian American population has grown more than 80% from 2000 to 2010 (see Advancing Justice’s recent report on the Asian American demographic in the South here), while Hispanic/Latino populations has grown more than 110%, according to the US Census. This growing demographic could have particularly important implications for politicians in the days to come.

Often headlines choose to highlight differences between Asian Americans and Latinos, focusing on language like “Asians overtake Hispanics as largest US immigration group” and reinforcing the “model minority” myth that effectively renders Asian Americans as a political tool against affirmative action.

Lost in translation is common history and solidarity that these communities have shared and common challenges they continue to face.

To bring to the forefront “real clear moments of collaboration between Asian-Americans and Latinos,” NPR’s Latino USA has put together a special report in the form of an hour-long podcast called “Hyphen-Americans.”

Particularly poignant in the podcast, editor-in-chief of Hyphen magazine (a publication focusing on Asian American issues) Abigail Licad summarizes some political collaborations among the Asian and Latino communities in the past including working together on labor movements in the early 20th century (among one of the most iconic collaborations being between Cesar Chavez and Larry Itliong) to collaboration in the undocumented youth movement in recent years.

Listen to the Latino USA podcast here:

Uncategorized

Pat McCrory press eventIn a rambling press conference today, Gov. Pat McCrory made a number of rather remarkable claims about the settlement of several hundred Central American child refugees in North Carolina.

During the event — read a summary and watch the full video by clicking here — the Governor claimed that the state knows virtually nothing about the children in question and reiterated the claims he made several days ago in a letter he signed along with five other conservative governors that sponsors for children were not properly vetted, that the children may not be properly vaccinated and that the children may be headed for the worlds of drugs and prostitution.

In other words, by all indications, neither the Governor nor his staff have bothered to check out the website of the Federal Office of Refugee Resettlement — i.e. a location in which many of his concerns and claims are specifically addressed and refuted on several pages devoted to the child refugees crisis.

Had he bothered to do so he could have read the following from a special page that describes the process being employed right now — which might have also provided him with a hint as to why the Feds haven’t invited McCrory and HHS Secretary Aldona Wos (who stood sullenly at the Guv’s side during his ramble) into the process: Read More