Uncategorized

Colorado online school distances itself from K12, Inc.

The Colorado Virtual Academy (COVA) recently broke off its future school management relationship with K12, Inc., a for-profit company that runs virtual public schools around the nation.

Online schools allow students to take their full course load from home computers, and K12 has been a national leader, with close to 85 percent of its revenues coming from public education dollars.

The Colorado charter school’s board of directors decided recently to part ways with the company’s hands-on school management for the 2014-15 school year, according to this article from a Colorado public radio station, KUNC. The school will still use K12-developed coursework and K12 will continue to run the school in 2013-14, according to KUNC.

From KUNC:

Brian Bissell, head of the COVA board, confirmed the change Tuesday. It will go into effect during the 2014-2015 school year. COVA has struggled with poor academic performance in recent years amid questions about K12 Inc.’s management of school resources—including teacher understaffing.

Bissell, who is a K12 Inc. shareholder and has three children enrolled in COVA, says that the school could still use K12’s curriculum but says school leaders have decided that new management is the best option.

“It became clear that at certain points in COVA history the interests of COVA—that is our students and their families, their teachers and Colorado’s taxpayers—these have not always been aligned with K12’s interests,” he said.

The Colorado school has been criticized for its low graduation rates (22 percent in 2011-12, according to state education statistics) and a discovery by state auditors that the school had overcharged $800,000 for 120 students who never attended, weren’t Colorado residents or whose enrollments couldn’t be verified, according to this in-depth 2011 New York Times article.

K12 spokesman Jeff Kwitowski said COVA is continuing to use K12, Inc. to manage the online school in 2013-14, and took issue with the idea that COVA was backing off from its use of the company.

From an email Kwitowski sent N.C. Policy Watch after this post’s initial publication:

We presented a self-management option to COVA Board so they could assume full management and operational control of the school next year, but they declined.  They wanted K12 to manage the school next year and use K12’s curriculum. Furthermore, they wanted the new agreement to state that if they received a new charter, a relationship with K12 would continue.  They voted to ratify the agreement.  In short, they didn’t “dump” K12, they stayed with K12.

Read more

Uncategorized

Another blow for K12 in Florida

A Florida school district refused an application for a virtual charter school contracted with K12, Inc., the for-profit online education company that’s come under fire for management and education quality issues.

From the Ocala Star-Banner:

The board voted unanimously Tuesday to deny the application.

“I’m concerned to go with a contract in the light of the investigation,” said School Board Chairwoman Judi Zanetti.

School Board members Ron Crawford and Angela Boynton agreed they could not support the virtual school because of the state investigation.

Superintendent of Schools Jim Yancey’s urged the board to deny the charter school because board members are not local and he believes K12 is only interested in turning a profit.

If the new school had been approved in Marion County, it would have started as a K-8 school in 2013-14 and would have expanded to all grade levels by 2018-19. At the school’s peak, the enrollment was projected to reach 296 students.

The company is currently under investigation in Florida, a leading state in the push for online education via for-profit companies,  for covering up its use of non-certified teachers for programs that required teachers certified to teach in Florida.

The company is seeking a spot in the North Carolina education market, and is appealing a Wake superior court judge’s decision in an attempt to open up a statewide online school, that would allow students from kindergarten through 12th grade to take classes over their home computers.

 

Uncategorized

K12, Inc. under more scrutiny for high teacher caseloads

K12, Inc., the Virginia-based company in the midst of a court battle to open up a virtual charter school in North Carolina, is facing more scrutiny in Florida, this time over caseloads of up to 275 students per teacher.

The high caseloads are for high school grades and were revealed in a confidential K12, Inc. memorandum obtained by Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and StateImpact Florida, two non-profit news agencies.

The caseloads vary based on how much compensation K12, Inc. gets per student, with one higher ratio set for $3000 per student and another for districts that give K12 $4,000 per student.

But those caseload range from 275-to-1, to 225-to-1, much higher than the 150-to-1 ratio that the state-run Florida Virtual School maintains.

From the StateImpact article: Read more

Uncategorized

K12, Inc. faces Florida investigation

A for-profit virtual school company fighting to open a public school in North Carolina isaccused of violating state law in Florida by having teachers falsify attendance records.

K12, Inc., a Virginia-based company that runs online-based public schools in 29 states, is under investigation by the Florida education department after several K12 teachers refused to sign class rosters with students the teachers had never taught.

From the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting, which reported on the Florida investigation Tuesday:

The Florida Department of Education has launched an investigation of K12, the nation’s largest online educator, over allegations the company uses uncertified teachers and has asked employees to help cover up the practice.

In one case, a K12 manager instructed a certified teacher to sign a class roster of more than 100 students. She only recognized seven names on that list.

“I cannot sign off on students who are not my actual students,” K12 teacher Amy Capelle wrote to her supervisor. “It is not ethical to submit records to the district that are inaccurate.” Read more

Uncategorized

Judge’s decision on K12, Inc. virtual charter school coming Friday

A Wake Superior Court judge will announce his decision Friday on whether a virtual charter school should open this fall, after the N.C. Board of Education neglected to take up its application.

The State Board of Education is asking Judge Abe Jones to set aside an administrative judge’s order and give the state board a second chance decide if the virtual charter school should be approved to open up in North Carolina. (The state education board didn’t act on the virtual charters application earlier this spring, saying they had already announced they weren’t going to take up online-only charter schools this year).

N.C. Learns, the non-profit set up to house the K12, Inc.-run school, wants the administrative law judge’s order to hold, so that they can open up this fall and begin recruiting students.  The company expects to find 2,750 students statewide in its first year, meaning more than $18 million of public education funding would be diverted from the already-tight budgets of public schools around the state.

The virtual charter school would be run by K12, Inc., a for-profit online education company that runs similar online-only school in 29 other states. Students at virtual schools take their classes online from their home computers, paid for by taxpayers.

There have been a lot of questions about the quality of K12 schools, with states like Ohio reporting four-year graduation rates as low as 30 percent, and down to 12.2 percent for black students.

North Carolina’s cohort graduation rate is 77.9 percent overall, and 71.5 percent for black students and 68.8 for Latinos.

In this case, The North Carolina Virtual Academy would be run by K12, and be open to students statewide. The school would get the same per-pupil amount as other charter schools get (ranges from $7,000 to $10,000, depending on where the student lives and if they are special needs), despite not having to shoulder the cost of having a physical school and paying for the building costs, and all that goes along with that.

This is just a quick update, and you can read more here about the hearing in today’s News & Observer, as well as this story from WRAL.

Check back with N.C. Policy Watch later on, where we’ll have more detailed account about yesterday’s hearing as well as Judge Abe Jones’ decision Friday.