The unemployed in North Carolina are in limbo once again, with the extended benefits for some of the long-term unemployment expected to dry up on Jan. 28 – less than three weeks from today.

The N.C. Division of Employment Security estimates 25,000 North Carolinians will be kicked off of their extended benefits by the end of the month, unless state officials take action in coming days to extend the federally-funded benefits past that date.

The anticipated Jan. 28 cut-off comes despite a two-month extension passed by the U.S. Congress on Dec. 23 that many thought would keep money flowing to the jobless to the end of February.

The state employment agency, known as the N.C. Employment Security Commission before being folded under the state’s commerce department, has posted a notice with limited information on its website about the cut-off .

As of December 23, Congress and the President authorized a two-month extension of emergency unemployment compensation (EUC) benefits and extended benefits. In North Carolina, the last payable week for extended benefits (EB) is expected to be January 28. Read More


No, you’re not imagining things: more and more events really ARE springing up all over in which average people are coming together to highlight the absurdity of a nation in which one in ten people are jobless at the same time that corporate profits and CEO salaries are shooting through the roof.  

Tonight’s event: A candlelight vigil/press conference this evening in Raleigh to shine a spotlight on our state’s unemployed and underemployed workers.

When: Tonight, 6:15 – 7:15 pm

Where: Bicentennial Mall: 16 W. Jones Street, Raleigh, NC (across the street from the NC General Assembly)


 The American Jobs Act (the Act) put forth by President Obama calls for increased infrastructure spending in an attempt to lift economic growth across the U.S.  With North Carolina facing an unemployment rate of 10.4 percent, far above the national average, there is a vital need for bold, effective job creation efforts to kick-start the state’s flagging recovery. 

Even as the jobs crisis continues, there is an urgent need to improve our nation’s public infrastructure. The Act would invest $30 billion for modernization and renovation of public schools and community colleges and $50 billion to repair the nation’s crumbling roads, bridges, airports, and railways. The Act would be funded as a part of the President’s long-term deficit reduction planRead More