The Charlotte Business Journal reports that MillerCoors will close its brewery in Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger’s hometown of Eden. This is from the CBJ story:

“The closure will affect 520 workers at the brewery, which opened in 1978 and is one of Rockingham County’s largest employers.

Rockingham County Manager Lance Metzger said after the company made the announcement to its employees, they were allowed to go home for the day to spend time with family.

MillerCoors expanded its Eden plant just four years ago with the addition of about 70,000 square feet of warehousing space, and at that time employed about 600 at the plant.”

Meanwhile, Senator Berger will hold a presser this afternoon at 3:00 to tout his latest austerity state budget — you know, like the last two, which were supposed to have turned North Carolina into a job-creating juggernaut. One wonders if he’ll take the opportunity to highlight the new state law (which started in the Senate) that makes unemployment insurance even harder to collect.

Meanwhile, Governor McCrory is on top of things at this critical juncture in state policy debates. His office has distributed one press release today — an announcement that the Guv and First Lady will host an “adopt a pet” event next month at the Governor’s Mansion.


As rumors continue to swirl on Jones Street about a deal reached Friday night on the FY2015-2017 budget (details to be released Monday), investments in North Carolina’s community colleges and workforce development programs remain an area of critical concern. These programs are essential for improving the skills and competitiveness of our labor force and ensuring that low-income workers have accesses to the training resources they need to achieve long-term upward mobility in their careers and lifetime earnings.

Job training and basic adult education are critical investments that give workers—especially those at the bottom of the income scale—the tools they need to enter higher-wage occupations. For many, these programs can mean the difference between a life trapped in poverty-wage jobs and a life with opportunities to climb the career ladder and enter the middle class. Career pathway programs in particular create avenues for workers to build occupation-specific skills consecutively over the course of a career, creating stepping stones for long-term advancement within that occupation.

As a result, these programs provide a powerful policy-level antidote to income inequality and wage stagnation. As the recent State of Working North Carolina report points out, wages remained largely flat in decade prior to Great Recession and then experienced significant decline in years since the recession. This is largely the result of policies that allowed corporate executives and investors to earn the lion’s share of increased productivity achieved by technological advancements.

Building skills through job training and workforce development is an important tool for returning these productivity gains to workers—both by strengthening the ability of individual workers to bargain for better wages and by improving the overall recognized skills of the state’s workforce, a key competitive advantage that will create more quality jobs in North Carolina.

Given this reality, all eyes are on the emerging final budget deal to see how legislators treat these important programs. Thus far in the budget debate, the Senate has cut more funding for these investments than the House in its proposal. In the House proposal passed earlier this summer, the Community College System received a $52 million cut compared to the $59 million cut served up by the Senate. Similarly, the House provides $15 in new money for instructional equipment at the community colleges, while the Senate provides just $5 million. And while the House provides $1.9 million for job training in economically struggling areas, the Senate does not, instead opting to invest $1.5 million to put community college “coaches” in high schools with the goal of helping high school students transition into vocational training programs upon graduation.

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In case you missed it, the North Carolina Justice Center is calling on North Carolinians to celebrate Labor Day this year by adding their names to a petition that calls for policies that promote quality jobs. Here’s the specific language:

“We, the undersigned, call on Governor McCrory to support policies that create quality jobs that boost the economy in our communities. And given that many jobs no longer provide workers with all the necessary aspects of quality employment, the Governor must recognize the necessity of policies that provide workers with the supports they are no longer receiving through work.

Specifically, we urge Governor McCrory to support the following policies aimed at creating quality jobs capable of boosting our state’s economy:

  • Raise the minimum wage to allow workers to afford the basics, make ends meet and provide for their families.
  • Allow workers to earn paid sick days and paid family medical leave so they can recover from illness, welcome the birth or adoption of a new child or care for a sick family member.
  • Promote retirement security, including access to sufficient income to retire with dignity, by establishing universal access to private retirement accounts.
  • Provide access to affordable health insurance through the expansion of Medicaid.
  • Allow workers to collectively bargain with their employers for better wages and benefits.
  • Adequately fund the pathways for skill development and career mobility in our community college system.

Let’s build a North Carolina economy that works for everyone.”

For more information and to add your name, click here.


As the ongoing budget stalemate continues in the General Assembly, the Senate offered up this morning its latest version of the “NC Competes” bill, the mis-named economic development package that will likely do very little to make North Carolina genuinely competitive for private investment and job creation in the global economy. Like previous renditions of the package, today’s proposal just doubles down on tax cuts and corporate subsidy programs that have proven time and again to be ineffective at meaningfully growing our state’s economy. But it largely goes from bad to worse in terms of the state’s discretionary incentive programs.

In general, economic development incentives are not the most effective tool to promote meaningful job creation or widely shared economic prosperity. They tend to influence only a small number of firm location decisions and frequently end up going to the urban, wealthier areas that need incentive dollars the least in order to attract investment. And in North Carolina, the Job Development Investment Grant program—the state’s flagship incentive program—has failed to live up to its promises of job creation and investment in 60 percent of its projects.

The truth is that incentives just don’t play a major role in making our state competitive for business investment. While JDIG may play a role in luring a small number of businesses to the state, the program only accounts for a vanishingly small amount of the total number of businesses, jobs, and investment that come to North Carolina. Since the end of the recession, 95% of the jobs created, 92% of the growth in the number of businesses in the state, and 99% of the state’s GDP growth have occurred *without* investment from JDIG.

So it’s unfortunate that the Senate doubles down on this ineffective approach. Here are few of the most problematic provisions:

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NC Budget and Tax Center

A report released yesterday by ThinkNC First argues that decision makers in Raleigh have walked away from many of the programs that helped to build a middle-class in North Carolina. Authors William Lester and Nichola Lowe of the University of North Carolina review data showing that middle-income jobs have become much harder to find over the last decade. The report ties this disturbing trend to recent policy decisions to underfund state programs that foster industries that create livable wages and ensure that all North Carolinians can access those jobs. The report makes a strong case that state leaders should heed our history and remember how North Carolina became an economic powerhouse in the Southeast in the first place.

The central problem documented in the report is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore. For the second half of the 20th century, North Carolina’s economy generated strong employment growth up a down the wage scale. Since the start of the Great Recession however, most of the job growth has been in either very high or very low paying industries. The labor market hollowed out, as many industries, particularly in manufacturing, saw employment decline. We here are the Budget and Tax Center have been watching this same trend, and its not pretty.

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