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The standoff between Baker Mitchell Jr, whose company runs four Wilmington-area charter schools, and North Carolina’s education agency is continuing.

Baker Mitchell of Roger Bacon Adademies, with students.

Baker Mitchell of Roger Bacon Adademies, with students.

The state has demanded – but has yet to receive– details from Charter Day Schools, Inc. about the salaries paid out to Roger Bacon Academy employees who work in the four public charter schools run by the company.

Owned by Mitchell, Roger Bacon Academy has exclusive contracts to manage and run four schools in Southeastern North Carolina — Charter Day School in Leland, Columbus Charter School in Whiteville, South Brunswick School in Bolivia and Douglass Academy in Wilmington.

The board chair of the non-profit in charge of the schools recently claimed that the private company owned by Mitchell won’t give the salary information to the schools’ board of directors.

John Ferrante, a Wilmington lawyer and chair of the non-profit Charter Day Schools, Inc., told Phillip Price of the N.C. Department of Public Instruction last week that the non-profit board of directors can’t get detailed salary information of headmasters and assistant headmasters from Roger Bacon Academy.

Price, DPI’s chief financial officer, summarized his Oct. 17 conversation with Ferrante in an email to State Board of Education Chair Bill Cobey and several DPI employees. N.C. Policy Watch received a copy of that email through a standing public records request it has with DPI.

“He [Ferrante] indicated that he had requested that information and they had responded that it was confidential and not available,” wrote Price in the Oct. 17 email. “Mr. Ferrante was concerned that his schools would be punished for something that was out of their control (and parents were expressing concern).”

The Charter Day Schools, Inc. board of directors governs the four charter schools –– and has the ability to hire and fire Roger Bacon Academy, Mitchell’s private company. Mitchell also owns another company that leases land and buildings to the charter school group.

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U.S. District Judge James A. Beaty, Jr., who serves in the Middle District of North Carolina in Winston-Salem, will take senior status at the end of June, 2014, as confirmed by chambers.

Judge Beaty, the lone African-American federal district court judge in North Carolina, was appointed by President Clinton in 1994 and served as chief judge for the district from 2006 to 2012. Before taking a seat on the federal bench, Beaty had served as a judge in Forsyth County Superior Court for 13 years.

By taking senior status, Judge Beaty can continue to receive his current salary but is not required to carry a full caseload. His seat, however, becomes vacant.

Beaty’s vacancy will be the second in the federal district courts in North Carolina, with the now 8-year vacancy in the Eastern District still in abeyance.

Although President Obama nominated Jennifer May-Parker for that seat back in June, U.S. Senator Richard Burr has failed without explanation to support that nomination, leaving the likelihood of her confirmation in question.

Beaty’s decision to take senior status follows that of Maryland-based Fourth Circuit Judge Andre M. Davis, who announced that he will take senior status in February 2014.