Archives

Uncategorized

President Obama announced today that he would nominate Jennifer May-Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina. May-Parker will fill the nearly-eight year vacancy created when Judge Malcolm Howard stepped down in 2005.

A graduate of the State University of New York, May-Parker is currently the Chief of the Appellate Division at the United States Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of North Carolina, a position she has held since 2010. She started her career as an Assistant District Attorney in the New York County District Attorney’s Office. She then worked as an Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Environmental Division of the North Carolina Department of Justice before moving on to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in 1999.

Uncategorized

Here’s a quick look at the impact that the House budget (being released in piecemeal fashion) would have on the courts:

Magistrates: Adds 16 magistrates to counties currently with only three, in line with the Governor’s proposal. The Senate proposed restoring 39.5 magistrate positions, to four magistrates per county, at a cost of $1.8 million.

Court reporters: No cuts to state court reporters, in line with the Governor’s budget. The Senate had proposed cutting court reporting funds and positions by half, with the savings to be used for contracts with private vendors.

Administrative Office of the Courts: Reduces the AOC budget by $3 million, in line with the Senate budget.

Funds for interpreters, expert witnesses and jury fees: Appropriates $1 million, in line with the Senate and the Governor.

Special Superior Court Judges: No cuts, in line with the Governor’s budget. The Senate proposed eliminating 12 Special Superior Court judgeships.

Drug Treatment Courts: No funding for Drug Treatment Courts, consistent with the Senate budget. The Governor’s budget appropriates $3.36 million to restore them statewide.

Prisoner Legal Services: Reduces that contract by $231,000 “to reflect decline in number of inmates,” consistent with the Governor’s budget. The Senate had proposed to eliminate the contract completely, using “prison legal terminals” instead.

 

Uncategorized

Close to 100 attorneys, progressive advocates and Triangle-area residents gathered today to discuss the continuing judicial vacancy on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina, growing numbers of federal judicial vacancies elsewhere, delayed U.S. Senate confirmations of presidential nominees and the ongoing need for increased diversity on the bench.

Speakers at the event, “Why Courts Matter,” included 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge James A. Wynn, Jr., and Andrew Blotky, director of Legal Progress at the Center for American Progress in Washington, D.C.

As Blotky pointed out, there are 82 current vacancies on the federal bench, with an additional 20 vacancies that will occur this year—meaning that nearly 65 percent of the population lives in a community with a courtroom vacancy.

And while it took roughly 35 days for the Senate to get George W. Bush’s nominees to a vote, it’s taken 150 days for Barack Obama’s to get to that point.

Both Wynn and Blotky called for the quick confirmation of fair, impartial, clear-thinking and diverse judges to fill those vacancies—which even when filled, Wynn added, would only solve the backlog. The U.S. Judicial Conference has called for the creation of additional judgeships to meet caseload demand.

The judges who sit on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina handle one of the heaviest caseloads in the country, approaching nearly 800 cases per judge in 2012. And they’ve been waiting for help for close to eight years now.

The court, based in Raleigh but with courtrooms elsewhere along the eastern part of the state, now has the dubious distinction of having the oldest federal judicial vacancy in the country. The seat&mdashh;opened up on Dec. 31, 2005, when Judge Malcolm J. Howard took senior status—has been unfilled for more than 2,500 days. Read More

Uncategorized

The next time you find yourself wandering the halls of the Wake County Courthouse (or courthouses elsewhere around the state), wondering why your day in court is delayed yet again, you might want to give state Senator Bill Rabon — or his colleagues Sens. Tom Apodaca and Neal Hunt — and thank them personally.

Together they’re the sponsors of Senate Bill 10, the proposal which among other things (like ridding the state of certain boards and commissions and replacing members of others with people whose thinking is more akin to that of the Republican majority), calls for the elimination of 12 special superior court judgeships.

Here’s the list of those on the chopping block (the cuts don’t include the business court judges):

20130206--Special_Superior_Court_Judges

Why the judges? Read More