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NC Budget and Tax Center

The proposed Senate tax plan and the recently released House tax plan aim to eliminate the personal income and corporate income taxes. These two taxes raise more than $11 billion and represent over half of the state’s total tax revenue. Among the contentions made by proponents of cutting and eliminating income taxes is that doing so will make the state’s revenue system more stable.

A 2013 report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) finds that, over the long-term, income taxes grow more than other state taxes and better reflect economic performance. Importantly, the income tax is not significantly more unstable than sales tax when viewed over time. And the benefit of the long-run growth of the income tax is lost with its elimination. Read More

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House Bill 786, the “RECLAIM NC” Act, will be up for a vote soon on the NC House floor.  In spite of the restricted driving permit that could be offered to some immigrants, it is on balance a bill that will be harmful to the immigrant community in North Carolina, and will increase racial profiling even among US citizens. In the midst of so much going on at the General Assembly, this sweeping immigration legislation has not received the attention and scrutiny it deserves.

In community forums about the bill’s provisions around the state — Hendersonville, Raeford, Charlotte, Durham, Greenville, and Wilson so far — advocates have seen that there are a variety of opinions on the bill, but that once immigrant families understood the many negative provisions in the bill and the difficulty of obtaining a “restricted driving permit” under HB 786, they did not support the bill.

Beyond being costly, increasing incarceration of immigrants, and eroding civil liberties for all North Carolinians, there are six specific reasons I believe that legislators should vote AGAINST HB 786: Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

This is the third of a three-part blog series presenting voices from other states that have unsuccessfully pursued versions of comprehensive tax “reform”. (See Part 1 and Part 2)

Commentary provided by Jan Moller, Director of the Louisiana Budget Project in Baton Rouge, LA.

Louisiana Budget Project

Louisiana is a conservative state with a very conservative governor who, until recently, was one of the most popular in the country.

But when Gov. Bobby Jindal unveiled a “revenue neutral” plan to eliminate Louisiana’s individual and corporate income taxes this year, something extraordinary happened: the people of Louisiana stood up, and the governor backed down. Less than three months after the plan was announced, the governor admitted defeat and said he was “parking” his package of bills. A week later, the chairman of the House tax-writing committee said any efforts to scrap the income tax were dead for the year. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center, Poverty and Policy Matters

Education is perhaps the most promising public investment for promoting long-term economic prosperity. That’s why providing low-income children access to preschool and providing a high-quality education to all students in North Carolina’s public schools is vital to our state’s future.

Yet, policymakers have introduced education bills that inconsistently define “poverty” and “at-risk” in ways that would reduce access to early learning for low-income 4-year olds and divert needed public school funding to private schools. Read More