Pretty low, according to the editorial board of the Winston-Salem Journal. An editorial posted over the weekend highlighted the dreadful/shameless effort of far right social conservatives led by Rep. Paul Stam and his protege, Senator Chad Barefoot (both of Wake County), to slip in a last minute provision that would have repealed all sorts of local ordinances — including some that ban wrongful discrimination against LGBT citizens, seniors and veterans. Here’s the Journal:

“Before ending its session early Wednesday morning, members of the legislature took one more crack at government overreach, trying to pass measures that would limit the authority and decision-making ability of local city and county governments. And they did so through underhanded methods that should put them to shame.

Members of a conference committee led by Sen. Chad Barefoot and Rep. Paul Stam — a panel of House and Senate members that is supposed to hash out the differences between their bills — inserted new language into an old bill, then used a procedural maneuver to send it to the Rules Committee, The News & Observer of Raleigh reported. From there, the bill would have gone to the House floor for a vote before members could absorb its implications…

If passed, it could have overhauled a wide range of nondiscrimination ordinances, housing regulations and workplace regulations that some cities and counties have adopted or may adopt. It would have banned local ordinances to establish a higher minimum wage. It would have voided local ordinances governing housing and rental practices, possibly affecting Winston-Salem’s efforts to encourage housing diversity, Mayor Allen Joines told The Associated Press….

It’s hard to discern a motive for this attempt at tying local governments’ hands, beyond simply exerting more and more control — which seems to be motive enough for this legislature, as seen by previous attempts this session to restructure local elections and redraw districts to Republicans’ advantage. The legislation would have hit the LGBT community and the poor, making their lives more difficult than they already are.

It also seems to be common practice now to try to sneak these changes through rather than permit debate….

Fortunately, the legislation failed, but we condemn these repeated underhanded tactics. This isn’t the way democracy is supposed to work.”

Unfortunately, such deceptive maneuvers are increasingly the tactics of choice on Jones Street, where not only does the current crop of lawmakers have little use for the public structures and systems of good government, they also have little use for the rules of transparency and openness that make it work properly.

Click here to read the entire editorial.


Despite having attempted to distance himself from newspaper advertising for a conservative Christian event that featured his image and the words: “Come Join me in a time of worship, prayer, fasting and repentance,” Gov. Pat McCrory did show up and speak at a Saturday event in Charlotte organized by a far right religious group known as the American Renewal Project which argues that the United States is a “Christian nation.”

McCrory used his few minutes on the stage to talk about substance abuse and to ask the people who were in attendance to join in the effort to combat the problem.  “We need your help because government cannot do this alone, you can do it, God can do it,” the Governor stated.

What was weirdest and most disturbing about McCrory’s appearance, however, was the spectacle of several middle aged men crowding around the Governor to lay their hands on him and dispense statements of hate and fear masquerading as “prayer.” Click the video below to watch as a fellow who appears to be American Renewal Project founder David Lane making several remarkable claims, including:

  • that the United States is “a nation founded on the Bible,”
  • that “fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge,”
  • that the U.S. committed the great sin of removing “prayer and Bibles from the public schools in 1963 after 350 years as a principal component, as the fixed point in order to judge society,”
  • that safe, legal abortion has left “55 million babies dead,”
  • that “homosexuals praying at the inauguration” and “red ink as far as the eye can see” were among the other great sins afflicting the country.

For this, Lane said, the United States “deserves judgment.” He then called on attendees to pray for McCrory and made several other offensive claims — including that the U.S. is a nation that was “founded for the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith.” Click below to watch:

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Good news from the folks at ACLU of North Carolina:

RALEIGH – The Wake County Board of Commissioners today voted to add lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals to those protected by the county’s employment nondiscrimination policies. The measure, approved as part of a consent agenda, ensures that county employees cannot be discriminated against for their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.

“We applaud the Wake County commissioners for joining the growing list of county and city governments that have expanded workplace protections in the interest of fairness and equality,” said Susanna Birdsong, Policy Counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of North Carolina. “Everyone deserves a fair chance at employment and advancement in the workplace, and no one should ever lose their job because of who they are or who they love. Employers know that part of attracting and retaining the best employees is offering a workplace that is fair, where qualified individuals are not discriminated against based on characteristics unrelated to the job. The sad reality is, despite overwhelming public support for protecting LGBT workers in North Carolina, it is still legal to fire or refuse to hire someone because of their sexual orientation in much of our state. We urge the General Assembly and other local governments across the state to pass comprehensive employment protections for LGBT workers.”

A 2013 Public Policy Polling survey found that 71% of North Carolina voters believe employers should not be able to discriminate against employees based on their sexual orientation.

State municipalities that have adopted LGBT nondiscrimination policies include Buncombe, Durham, and Mecklenburg Counties, and the cities of Asheville, Boone, Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Charlotte, High Point and Raleigh.

Stand by for some troubled souls on the right to tell us that barring discrimination somehow limits their “religious freedom.”


An editorial in this morning’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer rightfully blasts the outrageous and illegal actions of Rowan County, Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis and the preposterous behavior of the presidential candidates who’ve beaten a path to her jail cell and microphone stand:

“While Davis’ action may make her a champion in some circles, she was violating the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that in effect legalized gay marriage in all states. And though she presents herself as a symbol of religious conviction, public officials do not take the oath of office and accept their public salaries (in her case, $80,000) with the option of not doing their duty. Davis is entitled to invoke her conscience and her Bible in refusing to carry out duties she believes go against her beliefs. She can do so by resigning.

But neither her state nor her country gives such officials the right to pick and choose which laws they’ll enforce. Law enforcement officers, judges and elected officials have to act in accordance with the law. Their personal beliefs can’t trump their sworn duty.

Davis’ post is an elected one, so she’ll likely not be turned out of office. But a federal judge warned her that she was not to interfere with the legal licensing process again. He should stand firmly behind that warning.”

It’s as simple as that.


A teacher and assistant principal at Orange County’s Efland-Cheeks Elementary School have resigned their positions following an uproar over the teacher’s decision to read a gay-themed fairy tale to his third grade students in an effort to put a stop to bullying in his school.

From the News & Observer:

Omar Currie and Meg Goodhand of Efland-Cheeks Elementary School submitted resignation letters, Orange County Schools spokesman Seth Stephens said Monday.

Currie had said he would resign because he felt administrators did not support him after he read “King & King,” in which two princes fall in love and get married. He has said he read the book after a boy in his class was called gay in a derogatory way and told he was acting like a girl.

Previous press reports detail how the teacher’s decision to read “King & King” sparked an uproar in the community, with parents filing formal objections to the book resulting in two public hearings.

While the Orange County elementary school has twice decided to uphold the use of the book, one parent has appealed that decision to the superintendent. Orange County schools will hold a public hearing on the matter Thursday evening.

Currie, a North Carolina Teaching Fellow who is gay, says he’s felt unsupported in his decision to read the book to students and has been criticized for participating in an interview about the controversy on school grounds, even though he did not break any rules related to student privacy.

The News & Observer conducted a lengthy Q&A session with Currie that was published back in May. In the interview, Currie explains what happened the day he read “King & King,” what it’s like to teach in a rural school, and how he has experienced bullying himself as a gay African-American teen in middle school.

Can a teacher be an activist? (Currie and [assistant principal] Goodhand have been criticized for speaking at a conference for LGBT activists, which sought in part to challenge ‘the heteronormative culture in schools.’)

Currie: Yes, I think you should be. You have a group of students in your classroom. You leave a lasting impact and a lasting impression on them. It is important that you are championing the rights of those kids and the future of those kids. I think it’s important that you’re an activist and not just about things like that, but in general for the teaching profession and your rights as a teacher.

Read the full Q&A here.