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As Dean Baker notes this morning, the national economic news is encouraging. In addition to the record high Dow Jones average, Baker points out:

“The economy added 288,000 jobs in June, making it the fifth consecutive month in which the economy added over 200,000 jobs. This is the longest stretch of 200,000 plus job growth since before the recession. The job gains were broadly based. Retail was the biggest gainer, adding 40,200 jobs, with professional and technical services adding 30,100 jobs. Manufacturing added 17,000 jobs for the second month in a row.

The news was also positive in the household survey with the unemployment rate falling to 6.1 percent, a new low for the recovery. This was due to people entering the labor force and finding jobs; the employment-to-population ratio rose to 59.0 percent. This is a new high for the recovery, but still 4.0 percentage points below its pre-recession level. Another piece of positive news is that the percentage of people who are unemployed because they voluntarily quit their jobs rose to 9.0 percent, the highest since the collapse of Lehman. This is a sign of growing confidence in the labor market.”

Unfortunately, the economic news is not so encouraging in North Carolina. As Allan Freyer of the Budget and Tax Center pointed out in a news release on Tuesday: Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

We keep hearing that North Carolina’s economy is turning around. But while it’s true that we’re slowly making progress in replacing the jobs lost during the Great Recession, the bad news is that the overwhelming majority of these new jobs just don’t pay enough to make ends meet. In fact, many don’t pay enough to keep workers out of poverty, despite working full time. Check out the latest Prosperity Watch for details.

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jobseconomyDon’t get us wrong; it’s almost always great whenever a new employer is creating jobs in North Carolina. And the phenomenon of politicians claiming credit for job creation is nothing new; everyone likes good news and wants to be around when it’s delivered.

That said, today’s press release from the office of Governor Pat McCrory announcing the expansion of a plastics manufacturer in Henderson County borders on the ridiculous. This is from the release:

“Governor Pat McCrory and N.C. Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker announced today that Elkamet Inc. is expanding its North Carolina manufacturing operations in Henderson County.  The company plans to create 20 new jobs and invest more than $2.5 million over the next three years in East Flat Rock…. Read More

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Fast food workers 2Fast food workers are protesting the rampant wage theft by employers in their industry this week. There will be protests in Raleigh, Greensboro and Charlotte tomorrow. Check the bottom of this post for details.

This is from the folks at the Southern Workers Organizing Committee:

Workers Speak Out Against McWage Theft

On March 13, workers in 3 states filed a historic class action lawsuit against McDonald’s revealing that McDonald’s — one of the largest corporations in the world — has been committing rampant wage theft against its employees. Whether its forcing workers to work off the clock, not paying workers for overtime, or forcing workers to pay back register shortages out of pocket, fast food workers are getting robbed on the job.

On Tuesday, local McDonald’s workers will be coming forward to tell their own stories of having their wages stolen, on top of struggling to survive on poverty wages. Read More
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Living wageThe fallout from the destructive 2013 session of the North Carolina General Assembly continues to settle out across the state policy landscape.

As you will recall, during the waning days of the session, lawmakers enacted (and Governor McCrory approved) a new restriction on the ability of cities and counties to enter into contracts on their own terms. Last night, in response to the new law, Durham County Commissioners retracted part of the county’s forward-looking living wage ordinance.

The County Commissioners expressed regret about their action, which was in response to HB 74, signed into law by Gov. McCrory on August 23. The so-called “regulatory reform” law, among many other things,  Read More