N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory might be getting tired of answering reporters’ questions.

The governor joked that the state already has enough journalists, in comments he made yesterday at a press conference for an effort to evaluate what skills North Carolina employers need in future workers, according to this account from the Triad Business Journal.

McCrory — who, like almost all politicians, ever, has had a testy relationship with the press — was making a point that the state’s workforce needed more people trained for trade professions, like truck drivers.

“We’ve frankly got enough psychologists and sociologists and political science majors and journalists. With all due respect to journalism, we’ve got enough. We have way too many,” McCrory said to laughter from the audience.

He said we have too many lawyers too, adding that some mechanics are making more than lawyers.

“And journalists, did I say journalists?” he said for emphasis.

Click here to read the entire story.

Mark Binker, of WRAL, sidestepped the slight about reporters and vetted McCrory’s claim today about North Carolina had enough psychologists. Turns out North Carolina is one of many states with a shortage of mental health workers, including psychologists.

Journalism is far from a growing profession, of course. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics puts the total number of reporters, correspondents and broadcast news analysts at 57,600 in 2012 across the nation, and predicts those numbers will contract even more in coming decades.

And more than a few people hold the profession in low regard. More than a quarter of Americans think journalists contribute nothing or very little to society, according to a 2013 survey by the Pew Research Center.




Final appointments have been made today to a North Carolina political commission tasked with reviewing the implementation of the Common Core State Standards—well past a September 1 deadline by which the commission was required by law to hold its first meeting. The first meeting will take place Monday, September 22.

Governor Pat McCrory was one of the last state leaders to make his lone appointment to the commission, IBM executive Andre Peek.

“Andre Peek has a long history of service to our students and a track record of excellence in business,” McCrory said in a press release Tuesday afternoon. “His understanding of market-based industry needs will make him an invaluable member of North Carolina’s Academic Standards Review Commission.” Read More


The head of North Carolina’s troubled health and human services department told lawmakers Tuesday that moving the Medicaid program out from under her purview to a stand-alone agency would “be against common sense.”

“Absolutely not,” said N.C. Health and Human Services Secretary Aldona Wos in a response to a question about whether moving the $13 billion Medicaid outside of her domain would make things easier on the agency.

“To separate parts of [DHHS functions] out to the department will actually go backwards,” she said.

DHHS Sec. Aldona Wos

DHHS Sec. Aldona Wos

Wos made her comments Tuesday at a legislative oversight committee hearing. It also comes as lawmakers consider whether to embark next year on an ambitious plan by Senate Republicans to move the state’s Medicaid program to a standalone agency reporting jointly to the governor and state lawmakers.

A special program evaluation committee recently formed to consider different scenarios for Medicaid, an entitlement program that provides health care for the poor seniors, children and disabled residents, is funded through a mix of federal and state dollars.

Lawmakers have for years voiced frustration with faulty budget forecasts and unexpected cost overruns within the Medicaid program. Several Republican politicians — including legislative leaders and Gov. Pat McCrory — have held up the forecasting roblems as reason why North Carolina should not expand its Medicaid program, a move that would tap federal money to provide healthcare for an estimated 400,000 North Carolinians unable to afford their own insurance.

Wos, a Greensboro physician and wealthy Republican fundraiser appointed by McCrory to lead the state’s largest agency in January 2013, had plenty of other tough topics to cover with Tuesday’s legislative oversight committee. The tense reception has become a routine scenario for Wos as she’s grappled with negative coverage over high-dollar personal contracts and raises for close associates, as well as major disruptions in the state’s Medicaid billing and food stamp dispersal systems.

On Tuesday, Wos and her staff faced questions about a $6.8 million no-bid contract given to a consulting firm Alvarez & Marshal to advise and manage the Medicaid program.

Wos told lawmakers that she needed to hire the firm because she didn’t have any staff able to manage the program properly as she and other agency staff were developing a comprehensive Medicaid reform plan.

“We had an emergency,” Wos said. “We had to figure out how to get our daily work done.”

State law requires most contracts to go through a bidding process, in order to keep costs down and to allow for competition in lucrative contracts. Wos credited the consulting firm’s work with allowing the Medicaid program to meet its budget this year, and return $63 million to the state’s general fund.

Read More


Following a presentation today to educators and advocates at an NC Chamber of Commerce event, Gov. Pat McCrory told reporters that if local school districts do not hire people to fill vacant teacher assistant positions, then that action can’t be characterized as a result of a budget cut to TAs handed down by state lawmakers.

“If at the end of this legislative session, if they [LEAs] had teacher assistants in place—in positions—they should all be rehired, based upon the budget,” said McCrory. “If they were vacant or they were using that money for other reasons, you cannot then call that a cut, because they weren’t using the money for teacher assistants.”

Prior to signing the appropriations bill last week, Gov. Pat McCrory said that the fact that this budget preserves all teacher assistants jobs contributed to his decision to sign off on it.  

But according to the CFO of the N.C. Department of Public Instruction, Philip Price, the 2014 budget that the Governor signed actually spends $105 million less on TAs than what was planned for the upcoming year, which means local school districts will take a 22 percent hit to their teacher assistants – on top of huge cuts to TAs over the past several years. 

Lawmakers have said that this budget simply a reshuffles money that school districts were already spending on other things, like teachers, and that districts could choose to shuffle the money back to TAs if they want.

But years of under funding teacher assistants and public education as a whole has left school districts with little choice but to slash TA positions or leave them unfilled. Some districts have been forced to make the difficult decision of using teacher assistant money for badly needed teacher positions, thanks to state disinvestment. 

McCrory said folks should take a closer look at the language in the budget, which he says should allow local school districts to preserve teacher assistant jobs.

“If you were a teacher assistant last year, you should be rehired this year,” said McCrory.


A couple of days ago, I reported that Gov. McCrory was reaching out to state school superintendents to figure out a couple of fixes to the education budget that he proudly signed last week. As it turns out, he’s casting a wider net — on Monday, his education staff also met with staff at the N.C. Department of Public Instruction to brainstorm solutions, according to Dr. June Atkinson.

“I appreciate the Governor’s office reaching out to us…to find a solution,” Atkinson told N.C. Policy Watch yesterday afternoon.

If you’re not up to speed, here’s what’s at issue: educators and advocates around the state are up in arms over two provisions (among many) in the new state budget that they say hurt education: a) the move to stop funding local school districts on the basis of student enrollment growth, and b) a complicated allocation of money that puts funds that would normally go to teacher assistants in a pot for teachers — but school districts have the “flexibility” to move that money around (although some say that’s a false choice).

As a result, local school districts will have great difficulty budgeting and hiring necessary personnel to accommodate more students in their classrooms—and at the same time, they are faced with either instituting a 22 percent cut to their teacher assistants or saving those positions by taking money out of their funding streams designated for teacher positions.

Atkinson said no solution was ultimately crafted between DPI and the Governor’s office on Monday with regard to the enrollment funding issue.

“We are still thinking about how to get to a place where we can help schools do the planning they need to do, like hiring more teachers when enrollment goes up,” said Atkinson. “There’s no solution yet, short of the General Assembly reinstating annual student growth as a part of the base budget.”

McCrory agreed to sign the budget, in part, because it preserved teacher assistants. But local media reports already indicate TA jobs are disappearing as local districts prepare for the upcoming school year, thanks to state budget cuts.

And the provision in the budget that stops funding school districts based on enrollment growth received very little attention from lawmakers as they debated the budget — perhaps because they only had hours to digest it before voting.

Gov. McCrory’s office hasn’t returned inquiries seeking comment on this issue.