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Conspiracy kooksThere’s very little that right-wing opponents of President Obama and the Affordable Care Act aren’t willing to claim in public about America’s increasingly successful and transformative health care law. From “death panels” to imaginary massive tax hikes to allegations about global conspiracies and plots to impose martial law and suspend the Constitution, the loony conspiracy theories are as endlessly creative as they are delusional.

As a general matter, the kookiness does seem to be somewhat on the wane of late as the ACA slowly but surely moves millions of new people onto the insurance rolls while helping to contain the growth in health care costs. Heck, even the McCrory administration has finally recognized that North Carolina must expand Medicaid under the ACA.

For a few true believers and unrepentant, whatever-it-takes propagandists, however, the battle is still on and just about any anti-Obamacare claim — however preposterous — will do. For a classic example, check out this post by a staffer over at the Locke Foundation entitled “Medicaid Expansion Could Steer Resources Away From the Most Vulnerable.” Here, as best as can be determined, is the “argument”: Read More

Commentary

If there’s one story that’s been notably and inexplicably under-reported in the mainstream news media this week it’s been this one. As  our former colleague Adam Searing, to his credit, reported Monday:

In two interviews over the last few days, North Carolina’s Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Dr. Aldona Wos and NC’s Medicaid Director Dr. Robin Cummings address the question of Medicaid expansion in NC:  How soon, the presentation of options for policymakers and whether the state should create its own unique plan are discussed.  Both officials comment on the fact that the federal government is working with states to create state-tailored plans and seem clear that North Carolina’s Governor will be presented with options for expansion that can be taken to NC’s General Assembly.  No timeline is discussed, but NC’s legislature reconvenes in January 2015.

Click here to watch Health and Human Services Secretary Aldona Wos and Medicaid Director Robin Cummings finally confirm plans to do what advocates, providers and economists have been demanding for nearly two years: expand Medicaid.

News

State lawmakers won’t be making any major decisions on Medicaid reform before next year’s long legislative session, but Health and Human Services Secretary Aldona Wos wants to make it clear she opposes any plans that would move Medicaid outside her agency.

Secretary Wos reiterated Wednesday that such a move would sidetrack her agency from the work that has been done over the past 19 months.

“Such a decision would be disruptive. It would divert resources and human capital from the ongoing day- to-day operations of the division,” said Dr. Wos.

Earlier this month, Dr. Wos found herself defending the hiring of outside contractors to assist her agency with reorganization while she promoted plans that “flattened” the structure of the state Medicaid program, which provides healthcare for more than 1.5 million North Carolinians.

Click below to hear part of Wos’ remarks, or watch Wednesday’s full hearing here.
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News

North Carolina’s Health and Human Service Secretary Aldona Wos will be at the state legislature today, rolling out her plan to restructure the $18 billion state agency as well the state Medicaid program that provides healthcare for more than 1.5 million North Carolinians.

DHHS Sec. Aldona Wos

DHHS Sec. Aldona Wos

Wos, in a 14-page letter addressed to the heads of the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee, reiterated to lawmakers that she came into her $1-a-year job to find the state’s largest agency in disarray.

“As you know, I inherited a department with a well-documented history of serious and chronic problems,” she wrote. “We have been on a path toward a sustainable department over the last 20 months and we have built the foundation for a stronger Medicaid program.”

She hopes the restructuring of Medicaid program will to fend off proposals in the legislature by Senate Republicans to move Medicaid, the massive $13 billion program that provides health care to low-income children, seniors and disabled residents – to its own standalone agency.

Wos, a wealthy Greensboro physician and prominent Republican fundraiser appointed by Gov. Pat McCrory in January 2013, has had a rocky tenure as the head of the DHHS, with controversies swirling over her granting big salaries and contracts to associates and McCrory campaign workers. Her first year on the job also saw botched rollouts of two technology projects that led to lengthy delays in medical providers getting paid for Medicaid services and in thousands of low-income families accessing food stamps

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Commentary

Health-Reform-SBFinding irony and contradictions in the arguments espoused by Obamacare haters is not a difficult thing to do. Heck, one of the nation’s most powerful opponents of the new law is trying to force its repeal even as he embraces its remarkably positive impact in his home state!

That said, a new issue brief from the Center for Economic and Policy Research points to an especially interesting and problematic finding for opponents who continue to lambaste the law as an “assault on freedom”: the law is actually enhancing freedom. It’s doing this for millions of average Americans in a vitally important way by expanding their choices when it comes to how, when and where they work. Here’s the introduction:

“Most of the discussion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has focused on the extent to which it has extended health insurance coverage to the formerly uninsured. This is certainly an important aspect of the law. However by allowing people to buy insurance through the exchanges and extending Medicaid coverage to millions of people,
the ACA also largely ends workers’ dependence on their employer for insurance. This gives tens of millions of people the option to change their job, to work part-time, or take time off to be with young children or family members in need of care, or to retire early. Read More