AftertheStorm_5Governor Pat McCrory has been busy this week touring storm damaged parts of our state from weekend flooding.

When he returns to Raleigh he will find 31 bills on his desk from the recently concluded legislative session requiring his attention.

Many McCrory will no doubt sign. A few others — like HB 318 and HB 765 — he faces mounting pressure to veto.  Of course, the governor could simply wait and allow those bills to become law without his signature.

Here’s the complete list, as compiled by legislative staffers:


Bill Short Title Action Date Action Text
H8 Court of Appeals Election Modifications. H 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/30/2015
H126 Mortgage Origination Support Registration. H 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/1/2015
H215 Procedure for Waiver of Jury Trial. H 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/30/2015
H318 Protect North Carolina Workers Act. H 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/30/2015
H327 EMS Personnel Technical Changes. H 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/30/2015
H361 = S667 Principle-Based Reserving/Revise Ins. Laws. H 09/24/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/24/2015
H558 Reserve & Nat. Guard/Military Affairs Comm. H 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/30/2015
H647 Epi Pens in All Child-Serving Businesses. H 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/30/2015
H679 UNC Self-Liquidating Projects. H 09/25/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/25/2015
H698 Baby Carlie Nugent Bill. H 09/24/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/24/2015
H709 NCNG Tuition Assistance Benefit Amendment. H 09/22/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/22/2015
H712 Pilot Project/Used Needle Disposal. H 09/22/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/22/2015
H765 Regulatory Reform Act of 2015. H 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/1/2015
H850 Eastern Band of Cherokees/Law Enforcement. H 09/24/2015 Pres. To Gov. 9/24/2015
H924 Highway Safety/Other Changes. H 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/1/2015
H943 Connect NC Bond Act of 2015. H 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/1/2015
S37 = H19 Waive Tuition/Fallen Officer Was Guardian. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015
S97 = H522 State Advisory Council on Indian Education. S 09/24/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/24/2015
S195 Motor Vehicle Service Agreement Amendments. S 09/29/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/29/2015
S238 = H187 Stalking by GPS/Criminal Offense. S 09/29/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/29/2015
S279 Amend Qualifications/Practice of Counseling. S 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/01/2015
S313 Industrial Hemp. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015
S370 E-Signatures/Vehicle Title and Registration. S 09/24/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/24/2015
S379 Cemeteries Located on State Property. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015
S472 Local Incentives for Historic Rehabilitation. S 09/24/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/24/2015
S519 = H764 Amend Child Custody Laws. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015
S524 Grad Requirements/Sports Pilot. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015
S670 Term Limits for BOG Members. S 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/01/2015
S676 Autism Health Insurance Coverage. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015
S694 Reegan’s Rule/Enforce Pharm. Ben. Mgt. S 10/01/2015 Pres. To Gov. 10/01/2015
S698 Legacy Medical Care Facility/CON Exempt. S 09/30/2015 Pres. To Gov. 09/30/2015



The state House of Representatives tacked on a provision last night to a bill requiring public disclosure of three finalists for the ongoing search of the University of North Carolina’s next president.


The amendment, proposed by state Rep. Grier Martin, a Raleigh Democrat, was added on to a bill that would cap the terms members of the  UNC Board of Governors could serve. (Click here to read more about the term limits, and scroll down to watch video of Martin’s comments.)

It passed the House handily, 97 to 11.

Update,: The House, in another amendment, opted to strip the transparency measures out of the bill late Wednesday night. It also allowed the board to “appoint an interim President” for the UNC president.  

The bill now limiting the term limits of board members but without transparency measures went on to pass the House and Senate, and is now headed to McCrory’s desk. 

In addition to the posting of resumes and names of the candidates 10 days before any final decision, the amendment (click here to read) would also now require holding a public meeting about the final candidates.

A second vote on the proposal is scheduled for when the House convenes again at 11 a.m., and then Senate lawmakers would need to give their okay to the bill before it would head to Gov. Pat McCrory’s desk to be signed.

The UNC Board of Governors is in the midst of a search for a new system president after dismissing current president Tom Ross last January, for reasons that have not been fully explained but speculation has pointed to political motivations.

Ross, a Democrat, had led the state’s higher education system since 2011, but the UNC Board of Governors he reported to changed drastically during his tenure, after Republicans took over both chambers of the legislature soon after Ross took the job.

The 32 members of the UNC Board of Governors now consist entirely of appointees from a Republican-controlled legislature.

Up until now, the search for the next UNC president has been cloaked in secrecy, despite faculty requests to open up the process and allow final candidates to meet with members of the faculty.

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Planned ParenthoodAs the General Assembly gives approval today to legislation based in part on phony-baloney allegations against Planned Parenthood, advocates for women’s health and  reproductive freedom will rally at the General Assembly tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. as part of the national “I stand with Planned Parenthood” movement.

This is from local organizers:

“Here’s what’s going on in North Carolina.

Just last week, NC lawmakers attacked sex education although it’s proven to be effective – teen pregnancy rates are steadily dropping.

Our students need more than that and to let our legislators know, we are holding a People’s Assembly, complete with a sex-ed teach in on Tuesday, September 29.

We’re thinking, if they don’t support sex education, we’ll bring it to them!

Let’s show our legislators that our students deserve to learn what’s healthy.

So wear Pink, come to the legislative building and show our lawmakers that we are not backing down!”

Click here to RSVP and get for more information.


Another day and another lead editorial in Raleigh’s News & Observer rightfully blasting lawmakers for heartless and shortsighted  cuts to people in need:

“North Carolina’s Republican legislators leave no stone unturned when it comes to cutting the state budget to make possible tax cuts most benefiting the wealthy and businesses. Then, they roll that stone toward the disadvantaged and people of modest means.

The latest action will cut $110 million from the budgets for the state’s eight regional mental health centers. The GOP solution? They say the centers can just use their savings to fill the gap, rather than use the money saved to look for new treatments and innovations.

So, while those who are able to afford private care can have access to new treatments that might improve or even save their lives, those who depend on state-assisted care will be denied those treatments.”

But, as the editorial concludes, we shouldn’t be surprised:

“The shortsightedness, the lack of any kind of sympathy for constituents in need of mental health care, would be astonishing were it not part of a disturbing pattern designed by Republican lawmakers to pound the defenseless poor at any opportunity.

And without new treatments that might help, those who depend upon the state for mental health treatment will hold the line at best and perhaps suffer more severe problems should their difficulties persist.”

Click here to read the entire editorial.


University system leaders are happy with how they emerged in the state budget, saying they were grateful lawmakers opted to fund enrollment growth and other asks they had.

UNC system president Tom Ross (left) and John Fennebresque, UNC Board of Governor, in file photo.

UNC system president Tom Ross (left) and John Fennebresque, UNC Board of Governor, in file photo.

John Fennebresque, a Charlotte attorney who serves as the chair of University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors, called the $100 million overall increase for the university system “the best budget” since the Recession began in 2008.

Among the things lawmakers opted to fund in the two-year budget signed into law this afternoon by Gov. Pat McCrory were annual enrollment growth costs of $49 million, and earmarked dollars to vshore up East Carolina University’s medical school and Elizabeth City State University.

Chancellors will also be able to carry over financial savings they might find on their campuses to future years, in order to fund other priorities.

Those words of praise about the budget came despite the UNC system being handed $64.4 million in discretionary cuts over the next two years, and following nearly $500 million in cuts the system has weathered since 2010.

UNC system staff and faculty, like all state employees, also received a $750 bonus in the budget instead of any type of permanent salary adjustment.

Tom Ross, the president of the UNC system, said that he viewed the budget overall as a positive for the UNC system in comments he made during Friday’s meeting.

“Our enrollment was fully funded for both years,” Ross said, referring to the additional $49 million each year allotted to cover increasing numbers of students. “We’ve got to have the resources to educate the students when they come.”

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