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As Raleigh’s News & Observer reported yesterday, the executive director of the Pope-Civitas Institute, Francis DeLuca, has publicly apologized for last week’s blog post in which he criticized the the man who serves — technically anyway — as his chief funder’s boss (i.e. Gov. McCrory) for attending an event sponsored by minority economic development nonprofits. 

Among other things, DeLuca said that:

“In talking about the event the Governor attended, I painted with too broad a brush by implying that an elected official’s appearance at an event involving organizations that lobby for state funds is tantamount to cronyism.”

In short, DeLuca admits that, as his group has long had a tendency to do, he got carried away with his conservative rhetoric. Good for him.  Though imperfect and at times borderline incoherent (the apology features a new attack on N.C. Policy Watch for, it would seem, raising the issue of his initial attack in the first place) DeLuca deserves credit for admitting that he was wrong.

Now then, as long as he’s taken that important first step, here are just a few of several other things for which he should publicly apologize: Read More

Moral Mondays 2The General Assembly doesn’t return to Raleigh until next Tuesday for a brief (hopefully) veto session, but there will be plenty of action in the the policy world this week as well. 

Tomorrow in Raleigh, House Republicans will be holding a fundraiser at the exclusive and recently integrated Carolina Country Club on Glenwood Aveue. Meanwhile, worker advocates and progressive activists will be picketing outside from 4:30 to 6:00. Click here for more information.

On Thursday in Raleigh there will be another workers’ rights action — this one to support the burgeoning movement for low wage workers — especially in the fast food industry. The event is scheduled for 3:30 at Matin Street Baptist Chuch. Click here for more information.

Finally, of course, on Wednesday – the actual 50 th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington – activist will gather in 13 sites throughout the state in a series of events led by the North Carolina NAACP.

Here are the updated details: Read More

Rev. barber 2Invoking the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I have a dream” speech to “go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana,” North Carolina NAACP President William Barber urged civil rights advocates around the country to “go back to North Carolina” at press event today in Durham. Speaking as the nation prepares to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, Barber told the assembled audience that “North Carolina is our Selma of today” in the nation’s centuries-old battle for civil rights.

In a wide-ranging talk that focused mostly on the activities of local boards of elections to restrict college student voting in the aftermath of the passage of the so-called “Monster” voter suppression bill, Barber announced that the NAACP would be sponsoring 13 separate Forward Together Movement rallies next Wednesday August 28 (the actual 50th anniversary of the ’63 march) in each of the state’s 13 congressional districts – see below for details.

He also announced along with NAACP attorney Jamie Phillips that the NAACP had established a new toll-free hotline that North Carolinians can call with concerns about voting and voting rights. The number is Read More

Take a few minutes this morning to listen to Gov. Pat McCrory, in an interview with WUNC, respond to criticisms about the voter identification law he just signed and other controversial actions coming out of his office and the Republican-led legislature.

The 12-minute interview conducted by Frank Stasio (host of the Triangle-area NPR station’s “The State of Things“) delves into many topics, from recent legislation targeting abortion clinics, the decision to not expand Medicaid in the state and the elections bill signed yesterday and already being challenged in court on allegations of violating voters’ civil rights.

To listen to the interview by “State of Things” host Frank Stasio, click on the audio link on the WUNC news story about the voter ID bill.

In the WUNC interview, McCrory again compared the voter identification bill to measures that require identification to collect public benefits and buy some varieties of over-the-counter cold medicine that’s used to make meth. He used that comparison in the minute and a half Youtube video he put released Monday afternoon for the bill signing in lieu of a press conference.

“Nobody talked about disenfranchising people to buy Sudafed,” McCrory said in the interview with Stasio. “I frankly think our right to vote deserves similar protections.”

Read More