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Phil BergerWhat’s this? Did I read that right?

Yes here it is, dated  Monday, July 14: “Berger: Budget delay is incompetence”

And here’s Senator Berger’s lead quote:

“For the average person, when they have a deadline and they need to get something done, they are held accountable,” said Berger, an Eden Republican, at the weekly Republican news conference.

What the heck is going on? Has North Carolina’s Senate President Pro Tem had some kind of  revelation? Did he meet with a therapist or member of the clergy and decide to bare his soul? I mean, what could have possibly spurred such a powerful admission/confession?

Wait a minute. Oh, now I see; the article is dated Monday July 14, 2009. Berger was talking about the Democrats  — you know, the folks who were desperately trying to wend their way through the fallout from the worst economic crisis in 75 years.

Obviously, Berger wouldn’t use such language to describe the current situation — you know, the one in which state leaders are calling each other insulting names and just generally acting like children as they work diligently not to solve myriad problems – most notably an unnecessary budget shortfall – of their own creation.

Glad that’s cleared up.

Among the bills filed at the state legislature today was a resolution that would put North Carolina on a small list of states seeking to reconvene the Constitutional Convention of the States.

Yes, that Constitutional Convention. The last time they met was back in 1787.

The North Carolina resolution (click here to read) is part of a recent cause among far-right conservatives to seek financial limits on the federal government.

The North Carolina resolution makes no bones about the lawmakers’ disregard for Washington, finding that “the federal government has ceased to exist under a proper interpretation of the Constitutional of the United States.”

Read More

Voter-ID-signToday’s Winston-Salem Journal makes clear one again what advocates for open government have been saying for a long time: state lawmakers ought to be allowed behind absurd claims of privacy and immunity when it comes to the records of their communications as they went about the business of passing the nation’s most restrictive voting law. As the new editorial aptly notes:

“It’s bad enough that our politicians choose their own voters through their redistricting monopoly, but last year the General Assembly passed a so-called ‘voter identification’ bill that will clearly suppress who among us even gets to vote. Read More

Martin NesbittThere’s truly dreadful news tonight that one of the ablest members of the North Carolina General Assembly, Senator Martin Nesbitt, has died just days after announcing that he was seriously ill. It’s a grave blow to the state and we are all worse off for his passing.

There will be time in the days ahead for tributes to this wonderfully intelligent, caring and good-hearted man, but if you don’t know that much about him and would like to get a feel for who he was, go to the search function on this website and just type in his name. Upon doing so, you’ll find a host of articles in which he was featured — usually as a rare voice of reason in the state’s increasingly troubled policy debates in recent years.

When I did that, I was happy to find this post I wrote back in 2007 soon after this blog was first launched. In addition to featuring the now youthful looking photo of the senator that you see here, the post was a tribute to his willingness to stand up and speak the truth on an unpopular issue. I remember hearing at the time that he’d seen the post and appreciated it, so I offer it again tonight as one small and very fond remembrance:

Martin Nesbitt: Keeping us coming back

Martin Nesbitt: Keeping us coming back Read More

Puppy millsFew developments are surprising these days in the through-the-looking glass world of the North Carolina General Assembly, but the recent developments surrounding “puppy mills” legislation takes a very large cake.

As was reported last week in multiple places, one of the North Carolina Senate’s most powerful members, Senate Rules Committee Chairman Tom Apodaca, issued a statement in which he said that the Senate would not move legislation on this subject in 2014 because of its objection to the “tactics” of bill supporters — specifically the fact that a supporter meeting with Senator Bill Rabon openly recorded the Senator’s inflammatory comments on the subject and then made them public.

This was apparently not an idle threat by Apodaca. Yesterday, N.C. Policy Watch obtained an email sent by another lawmaker (Senator Bill Cook of Beaufort County) to a concerned constituent in which he recited Apodaca’s threat verbatim (see the bottom of this post for the full text). Read More