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Medicaid expansionFor years now, poor and working North Carolinians who would benefit greatly from Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act have been held hostage as Governor McCrory procrastinated and offered excuses. First, the Guv claimed that the Medicaid system itself was “broken” and in need of repair before it could be expanded. Then, he claimed that it would be inappropriate to act until the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the constitutionality of the ACA itself.

Today, McCrory is running out of excuses. The Supreme Court took care of the constitutionality question a few weeks ago and yesterday, McCrory himself laid Excuse #1 to rest.

According to a statement from the Governor’s office, Medicaid is now in the black:

“The Department of Health and Human Services reported today that the North Carolina Medicaid program ended the 2014-15 state fiscal year with $130.7 million cash on hand. This is the second consecutive year the Medicaid program has finished with cash on hand.”

What’s more, that surplus is more than enough to cover state costs of implementing expansion. As a December 2014 study from health policy wonks at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University reported (see page 15), expansion will actually save the state more than $300 million over the next five years. In 2020, however, there will be a modest net cost to the state of $91.7 million.

The obvious takeaway? Even if the state flushed away the savings that expansion will bring between now and 2020, it can easily cover the modest bump in costs in 2020 merely by socking away the current surplus.

Not surprisingly, however, the Guv is already moving the goalposts. Read More

Commentary

As Adam Linker noted yesterday in the post below, there are no more excuses now for Gov. McCrory:

“Now that the Supreme Court has ruled — again — that the structure of the Affordable Care Act is constitutional, it is time to move forward with making the law work better in our state.

The first, and most important, step is accepting federal funds to extend the benefits of affordable health insurance coverage to 500,000 more people in our state. Gov. McCrory said last year that his staff was assembling options to expand coverage and that he would make an announcement about his recommendation after the Supreme Court ruled in King v. Burwell. The ruling has arrived.”

This morning, major newspapers around the state are echoing this sentiment.

From the Durham Herald-Sun:

“With the question of the act’s validity answered by the court, it’s time for North Carolina
to reverse its unfortunate decision to not extend Medicaid coverage to an estimated
500,000 individuals and families too poor to qualify for the ACA subsidies.”

From the Greensboro News & Record:

“This was an enormous victory for President Obama. Most importantly, it avoids the human toll that would have resulted from an adverse ruling.

Next, North Carolina should expand Medicaid coverage for thousands of residents who still fall between the coverage cracks. State leaders should have expanded Medicaid in the first place, but seemed more intent on thumbing their noses at the president than doing what’s right. Not only is most of its cost paid for by the federal government, but also it would create as many as many as 43,000 jobs. Gov. Pat McCrory had said he wanted to wait for the Affordable Care decision first before considering that step. Now that the high court has ruled, it’s time for him to act.”

From Raleigh’s News & Observer:

“Meanwhile, Gov. Pat McCrory has shown a lack of political courage in declining to support an expansion of Medicaid, the state and federal insurance program for the poor and disabled. The federal government, under the Affordable Care Act, would pay 100 percent of the expense in the first three years and at least 90 percent thereafter. McCrory said he was awaiting the high court decision to make his own decision about pushing for Medicaid expansion. But he wasn’t. Once again, the 500,000 North Carolinians who could be helped are left to hope that a move to expand Medicaid comes before an illness or an accident does.”

In other words, come on Governor, get off your keister do the right thing!
Commentary

News item from the Charlotte Observer:

“The Fort Mill, S.C., Republican who went public Tuesday with his plea for help paying for sight-saving surgery had raised almost $12,000 by Wednesday evening – most of it from self-described liberals and Affordable Care Act supporters saying they hope he’s learned a lesson.

That’s enough to ensure he can get the treatment he needs, said Dr. Andrew Antoszyk, an eye surgeon with Charlotte Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Associates. After reading Luis Lang’s story in the Observer on Wednesday, Antoszyk said he’d work with Lang and with Novant Health to give him the care at reduced cost.

Lang, a self-employed handyman, declined to get health insurance until he needed expensive surgery for diabetes-related eye problems. His story went viral, spurring blogs and comments, national media commentary, thousands of social media shares and vigorous discussions across the country.

His GoFundMe.com page has been shared on social media more than 1,700 times since Tuesday morning, with more than 600 people making small donations, often with political commentary.

‘No one should be without medical (care) even if they have not made their own best choices in life,’ wrote Steve Kadel, who gave $10. ‘The party of personal responsibility (has) left you hanging on your own consequences. Progressives like me think that’s just cruel. Be well.’”

Whether Lang or other Affordable Care Act naysayers will learn a lesson is unclear at this point — Lang himself, offers rather muddled comments on the subject later in the Observer article — but a few things are clear from all this:

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Commentary

In case you missed it, be sure to check out Ned Barnett’s column from Sunday’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer in which he explains why the myth of runaway Medicaid spending is just that — a myth.

“Refusing to expand Medicaid may look reflexively anti-Obama and hardhearted, but Republicans say it’s a matter of fiscal responsibility. They say that Medicaid’s annual costs are prone to unpredictable surges and that its overall rate of increase means it will soon crowd out the state’s ability to meet its other obligations.

But the Medicaid monster is a myth. A new analysis by the nonprofit Medicaid management organization Community Care of North Carolina found the health care program to be a steady expense. It’s expensive, yes, but it does a lot to improve the health of a vulnerable population and may well head off more expensive medical costs that would inflate premiums for everyone.

John Alexander, Community Care’s vice president for Medicaid financial performance and analysis, sat in a conference room last week and presented the reality behind the illusion. ‘We found that spending on Medicaid isn’t broken, it isn’t unpredictable, it isn’t out of control,’ he said.

Indeed, he said, year-over-year spending on Medicaid is consistent, its administrative costs are relatively low and the cost per patient is going down, falling 9 percent in the last four years.”

The essay goes on to explain how supposed spikes in Medicaid spending in recent years are really just a result of the end of federal stimulus spending in response to the Great Recession:

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Commentary

The wonks at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities are out with a new and powerful report today on the increasingly-evident benefits of Medicaid expansion. Here’s the lead:

“In the short time since states have been able to expand Medicaid to low-income adults under health reform, a clear divide has emerged between states that have expanded Medicaid and those that have not. Since the major coverage provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) took effect in 2014, insurance coverage rates have improved across the country, but the gains are far greater in the states that have expanded Medicaid. As a result, hospitals in expansion states are treating fewer uninsured patients, and the amount of uncompensated care they are providing is declining steeply. Moreover, contrary to critics’ claims that Medicaid expansion is financially unsustainable for states, there is increasing evidence that expansion has saved states money, and these savings are expected to grow over time.

The Medicaid expansion has had an especially dramatic impact in Arkansas and Kentucky, which both had high uninsurance rates and limited Medicaid eligibility for non-elderly adults before health reform. Both states’ uninsurance rates have fallen by half in just over a year, and the expansion is expected to save each state more than $100 million by the time their current state fiscal years end on June 30.

Meanwhile, the states that have not expanded Medicaid are falling further behind. In the non-expansion states, large numbers of low-income people remain uninsured and without access to affordable health coverage. These individuals are caught in a ‘coverage gap’ because their incomes are too high for Medicaid but too low for subsidies to purchase coverage in the marketplace. Hospitals in these states continue to provide large amounts of uncompensated care, and the states are missing the opportunity to leverage billions of dollars in new federal funding through the Medicaid expansion.”

Click here to see the numbers and read more details about how North Carolina continues to fall farther behind as the result of its stubborn and self-destructive refusal to expand the program.