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The latest outrage in the climate change wars comes, not surprisingly and appropriately enough, from Exxon. Think Progress has this story entitled “Exxon is behind the landmark climate report you didn’t hear about”:

Climate change is already impacting all continents. But it isn’t yet impacting all companies. The latest installment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Fifth Assessment Report released on Monday confirmed the former. A report released by Exxon Mobil the same day about how greenhouse gas emissions and climate change factor into its business model found that climate change, and specifically global climate policies, are “highly unlikely” to stop it from selling fossil fuels for decades to come. Read More

Picture of Richard Glyndon CatlinReporter John Murawski has a fascinating story in the morning’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer in which he explains one of the enormous and unsolved problems with fracking: What to do with the waste.

According to the story, the current plan for the would-be frackers in North Carolina is to truck all of the millions upon millions of gallons of toxic chemicals that would be produced via fracking in the Piedmont down east to be injected underground.

But a conservative Republican lawmaker from that area who also happens to be a hydrogeologist is quoted in the story as saying this is a terrible idea. Read More

The newly released 80 page report from the experts at nonprofit group State Review of Oil & Natural Gas Environmental Regulations makes it clear: North Carolina needs a more robust regulatory infrastructure to handle any kind of significant increase in oil and gas exploration. Widespread drilling — much less fracking – are not the kind of issues for which it will be sufficient for state regulators to simply “wing it.” 

Here’s how the report puts it:

Program Recommendations

The review team recognizes that North Carolina is evaluating the potential development of its oil and gas resources and is also evaluating changes that may be appropriate if that development were to occur. While this report makes no recommendations on whether or not such development should occur, the review team has made a number of recommendations for consideration if that development occurs. A summary of the more important recommendations follows.

I. Need to Develop Formal Standards Read More