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Pat McCrory 2Governor McCrory’s poll numbers remain relatively strong – especially in comparison to the General Assembly’s – and thus far it’s easy to see why. The Guv is an affable guy who smiles a lot and mostly avoids picking public fights. He signs popular bills in front of TV cameras and unpopular ones behind closed doors. When he is confronted with a tough public question you can wager that his response will be: a) a poll-tested sound bite, b) a promise to study and “fix” the problem, or c) both.

The common assumption thus far is that McCrory’s outward superficiality is simply a strategic move: Why get all caught up in the weeds of any number of controversial issues when you can respond with a platitude or blame your predecessor’s supposed failures? And that may be the ultimate explanation. Today, however, there were at least a couple of troubling signs that the superficiality you see may really be all there is.

Number One was Read More

The safety and quality of life of communities across the North Carolina rely in part on investments in our judicial and public safety systems. Significant funding cuts to the Justice and Public Safety (JPS) budget in recent years have challenged various JPS agencies to take on more responsibilities with fewer resources. Since FY2009, net appropriations for the JPS budget have been cut by more than $218 million.

In recent years, cuts in funding to the JPS budget have also resulted in increases in court costs and fees. However, the Fiscal Research Division reports that court costs collections are down about 10 percent. The legislature closed four minimum custody programs in order to reduce costs in 2011. Furthermore, state funding has been completely cut for some divisions within JPS, which are now mandated to operate as fully-receipt funded operations. Read More

Gov. Pat McCrory signed the bill this afternoon that prevented North Carolina from adding groups of low-income residents to Medicaid insurance, putting the state in with a handful of other states with Republican governors that have turned down the expansion.

The expansion could have given 500,000 low-income residents health insurance, and would have been largely paid for with federal dollars in the first three years. McCrory signed the bill into law in private, without press or media access to the signing.

The N.C. Justice Center’s Adam Linker offered his take here on McCrory’s decision, saying that, “(i)t will mean more people delay necessary health care treatments. It will mean a population that is sicker and dies sooner….”

McCrory’s press office released this written statement from there governor afterwards:

In my first eight weeks as governor I’ve had to make some difficult decisions.  My team conducted a thorough review of the Affordable Care Act and its impact on North Carolina.  Before considering Medicaid expansion, we must reform the current system to make sure people currently enrolled receive the services they need and more taxpayer dollars are not put at risk.

 

Governor Pat McCrory today will reject billions of federal dollars from Obamacare to cover 500,000 more poor people under NC’s Medicaid program.  McCrory says the main reason is that NC Medicaid is “broken.”  But that’s just a talking point borrowed from Governors in states like Louisiana, Alabama and South Carolina.  McCrory should be proud of NC Medicaid, our Community Care program – it’s award-winning and seen as a national model and national leader:

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Pat McCrory 2Raleigh’s News & Observer reports that Gov. McCrory has given a “thumbs down” on the proposal to re-legalize payday lending in North Carolina. Meanwhile over at the General Assembly, there’s no word whether bill sponsor Sen. Jerry Tillman slammed any doors when he heard the news, but reliable reports indicate that the Senator is, shall we say, seriously miffed at the Guv.

Let’s hope McCrory sticks to his position anyway and kills this nutty idea before it goes any further.