Payday loansPayday lenders (and other short-term lenders) along with their trade associations have spent more than $13 million on lobbying and campaign donations since 2013, according to a new report put out by the Americans for Financial Reform (AFR).

The report is particularly troubling because it comes at a time when the government is finally beginning to crack down on “quick-fix” lenders, who are known for trapping vulnerable cash-strapped borrowers in cycles of debt by charging obscenely high fees in exchange for an immediate payout. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is expected to announce a set of rules next year that could bring dramatic changes to the payday lending market. Additionally, the Department of Justice has been zeroing in on banks and payment processors that knowingly facilitate fraud. The only enforcement action brought by the Justice Department in this operation (known as “Operation Choke Point”) so far has been in North Carolina. The Four Oaks Bank & Trust of North Carolina in collaboration with a Texas-based payments company was found to have processed around $2.4 billion in illegal transactions including those benefiting payday lenders. Read More


Payday loansThe Charlotte Observer hits a home run this morning with this editorial entitled “An industry that hasn’t been missed.” As the authors make clear, North Carolina elected leaders should continue to use all tools at their disposal to resist the efforts of “payday loan” sharks to reintroduce their predatory (and long banned) 400% loans into our state. The conclusion of the editorial sums things up nicely:

“Congress recognized the predatory nature of the industry and in strong bipartisan fashion in 2007 capped interest rates at 36 percent APR on loans made to active military members and their families. It was right for our armed forces, and it’s right for everyone else.

It’s not a partisan issue. Many Republicans and Democrats alike oppose the practice, and some in each party support it. Whether you’re morally offended by a 400 percent interest rate or just see the damage it does to those who can least afford it, there’s a lot not to like.

Congress should ban the practice nationwide. Until that happens, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau should install rules banning some of the most nefarious practices. And North Carolina legislators should stand firm and tell payday lenders: We don’t want your money.”

Click here to read the entire editorial.

And click here to get the full skinny on this morally bankrupt industry.


Predatory loansIn case you missed it over the weekend, the New York Times ran a thoroughly logical editorial that rightfully called for federal regulation to crack down on the scam artists who sell payday loans and other similar debt traps in numerous states across the country.

As the editorial rightfully notes, it’s all well and good to propose and enact laws like the “Military Lending Act,” which seeks to prevent our military personnel from getting caught up in these rip-offs, but the same logic obviously applies to other vulnerable consumers as well:

“Poor and working-class people across the country are being driven into poverty and default by deceptively packaged, usuriously priced loans. The obvious solution is a national standard for consumer lending. Both the House and Senate have bills pending that would adopt the 36 percent standard for all consumer transactions, including those involving payday loans, mortgages, car loans, credit cards, overdraft loans and so on.”

And while North Carolina has done a better job than many states in protecting its citizenry from the scammers, there’s plenty that comprehensive federal regulation which sets a ceiling on rates would do to benefit us — not the least of which is the way it could cut back on the flood of money spent by the loan industry on buying political influence and corrupting our politics.

The bottom line: What’s good for protecting our service members is good for protecting all consumers. If Congress had even a smidgen of courage, it would enact such legislation ASAP.



3-4-13-NCPW-CARTOONTomorrow the North Carolina House Banking Committee will hear proposed legislation (already passed by the Senate) to jack up rates on already exorbitantly priced installment loans.

And in case you had any doubts as to what the proposal (and others like it) are at least partially about, check out this news story from earlier today over at Bloomberg News:

Payday Lenders Evading Rules Pivot to Installment Loans

For three years, payday lenders have been bracing for dedicated scrutiny from a U.S. agency for the first time. One way they’re getting ready: switching to loans designed to fall outside the regulator’s grasp.

Companies including Cash America International Inc. (CSH) and Advance America Cash Advance Centers Inc. (AEA) are increasingly selling longer-term installment loans to avoid rules the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau may impose on their shorter-term products.

Read the entire article by clicking here.


Loan sharksThere’s a common perception in the General Assembly these days that storefront consumer finance shops are not as bad a payday lenders. Indeed, this has been a common explanation offered by members of the Senate as they advanced legislation in recent weeks that will jack up the interest rates on consumer finance loans. 

If this is true, however, the difference between the two predators is just a matter of degrees, not basic characteristics. If payday lenders  are the great white shark of small loan predators, then finance companies are the tiger sharks. This truth is made clear in a new and powerful article from the muckrakers at the national news website, Pro Publica entitled “The 182 Percent Loan: How Installment Lenders Put Borrowers in a World of Hurt.” Read More