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The good government advocates at the Alliance for Justice have released a new film entitled “Unequal Justice: The Relentless Rise of the 1% Court.”  

The film “explores the growing pro-corporate bias in key Court decisions and their real-world impact on ordinary Americans. Steadily and relentlessly, the Court has been transformed into an institution that frequently serves the interests of the wealthiest one percent. Taking judicial activism to new levels, these justices have rendered a series of pivotal cases to fundamentally change the balance of power in American society, favoring business interests and limiting access to legal remedies for everyone else. These decisions threaten to undermine the core concept of fairness that is embodied in the motto carved into the Supreme Court building, turning Equal Justice Under Law into Unequal Justice Under Law.”

Learn more about how you can get a free copy and host a screening by clicking here.

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Prof. Paul Krugman explains some basic facts about how to stimulate an economy today. The column — entitled the “I-Phone stimulus” makes it so clear and simple that even politicians ought to be able to understand it.

The only problem, of course, with Krugman’s prescription is that it’s not based on the only politically viable strategy in the modern American plutocracy, i.e. giving even more money to rich people and large corporations.

 

It seems that everyone’s getting numb to the disturbing stories coming out of the Duke-Progress merger, but this one ought to register something on the outrage meter.

According to AP and the Winston-Salem Journal, Duke Energy has agreed to hold some of its big wholesale customers “harmless” for any costs that they may incur as a result of the merger. Read More

Author and thinker Dr. David Korten has a worth-reading post this morning at Common Dreams. This is the intro:

“The political debate in the United States and Europe has focused attention on public financial deficits and how best to resolve them. Tragically, the debate largely ignores the deficits that most endanger our future.

In the United States, as Republican deficit hawks tell the story, ‘America is broke. We must cut government spending on social programs we cannot afford. And we must lower taxes on Wall Street job creators so they can invest to get the economy growing, create new jobs, increase total tax revenues, and eliminate the deficit.’

Democrats respond, ‘Yes, we’re pretty broke, but the answer is to raise taxes on Wall Street looters to pay for government spending that primes the economic pump by putting people to work building critical infrastructure and performing essential public services. This puts money in people’s pockets to spend on private sector goods and services and is our best hope to grow the economy.’

Democrats have the better side of the argument, but both sides have it wrong on two key points. Read More