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In case you missed it, WRAL.com had an instructive story last night entitled “NC education spending on a decades-long slide.” The story reported that the percentage of the North Carolina budget dedicated to K-12 has been falling steadily:

“WRAL News reviewed budget numbers for the last 30 years and found that the percentage of general fund dedicated to K-12 classrooms has been on a long, slow slide, even as the total dollars for education increased.

In 1984-85, the $1.89 billion authorized for public education accounted for 43.7 percent of the budget. A decade later, the $4.08 billion authorized in the budget was 42 percent of the 1994-95 budget. By 2004-05, the state was spending $6.52 billion on public schools, which accounted for 41.1 percent of the state budget.

The slide has accelerated in recent years because of the national recession, and the $7.9 billion authorized in the 2013-14 budget meant only 37 percent of the general fund was earmarked for public schools. Even with the North Carolina Education Lottery chipping in money for school construction and early childhood education, per-pupil spending has dropped since the lottery started eight years ago.”

And, of course, as the Budget and Tax Center has reported repeatedly, K-12 funding has fallen in absolute terms as well in recent years when one adjusts for inflation.

The bottom line: There’s no way North Carolina is going to get to where it needs to get if it stays on this track. Moreover,  even under the House and Senate proposals to raise pay, the long-term decline remains unaddressed.

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In case you missed it, the editorial page of the Governor’s hometown newspaper, the Charlotte Observer, is urging the man they endorsed for office back in 2012 to stand up the legislature over the repeal of the Common Core standards in education:

“The governor reiterated his belief in Common Core again Thursday when he told reporters that eliminating the standards was ‘not a smart move.’ McCrory also said, however, that he wouldn’t go so far as to say he’d veto a bill that repeals Common Core.

That has us worried. Our governor has an unfortunate history of professing one thing, yet cowing to Republican lawmakers when they send legislation his way….

Repealing Common Core also would waste years of curriculum and teacher preparation for the new standards, and it would steal one of Common Core’s critical benefits – the opportunity to compare our scores with other states and make adjustments based on best practices around the country.

The reason Republicans want to repeal Common Core, instead of fixing its minor issues, is that conservatives have fallen for the fiction that it’s a federal takeover of education. In other words, it’s politics. The governor knows it. Will he stand up to it, or will he once again decide to give in to politics himself? This time, our state’s children await the answer.”

Read the full editorial by clicking here.

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Education cutsIt’s actually pretty remarkable that we even need a study to confirm something so obvious (What’s next? “Study confirms that days get longer in the summer and shorter in the winter”??) but a new study by the Economic Policy Institute does confirm once again what anyone with any common sense has long understood — namely, that investing in public education pays big dividends for states.

Here are the key findings — to which we can only wish Gov. McCrory, Art Pope and the General Assembly would pay attention: Read More