Archives

EugenicsAs Chris Fitzsimon made clear in this morning’s “Monday Numbers,” there is simply no good reason for the state of North Carolina to shut off applications for compensation to surviving eugenics victims. Having made people wait decades, what is the point of limiting the possibility for recovery for people — especially since so many of those injured are likely to lack easy access to legal assistance they need?

The North Carolina NAACP issued a statement early this afternoon making just such an argument. Click here to view it.

From the good people at the UNC Law School Center for Civil Rights — pass it along:

If you or a family member was a victim on North Carolina’s forced sterilization program, you may be eligible for compensation from the state. The deadline for filing a claim for compensation under the Eugenics and Asexualization and Sterilization Compensation Program is June 30, 2014. The UNC Center for Civil Rights, along with other volunteer lawyers, are providing free assistance to those filing claims. We encourage victims and their families to call us with questions about eligibility and how to fill out the claims form. We also encourage victims and their families to attend one of the free clinics we are conducting with help from the NAACP, local churches and community leaders, during which we will provide additional information and assist in filing claims.

  • Thursday, May 22, 10am-1pm at the Lucille W. Gorham Intergenerational Community Center, corner of 5th and Tyson St., Greenville, NC
  • Thursday, May 29, 10am-1pm at the Martin Street Baptist Church, 1001 East Martin St. Raleigh, NC

Clinics will also occur in Mecklenburg and Hertford Counties on June 5 and June 12, times and locations to be publicized soon. Below are answers to frequently asked questions we have received about the process:

Q: Where can I get the claims form?
A: You can download the form at http://www.sterilizationvictims.nc.gov/, or call the Office of Justice at 1-877-550-6013 or 919-807-4270.

Q: Who is eligible for compensation?
A: Living victims of the program are eligible, as well as the heirs of deceased victims so long as the victim was alive on June 30, 2013. Read More

In case you missed it, the Charlotte Observer has reprinted a fine column authored by Al Hunt of Bloomberg News under the headline: “Voter suppression is the greater racist outrage.”

As Hunt aptly notes:

“The widespread condemnation of the vile prejudice expressed by a professional-basketball-team owner and a Nevada rancher underscored the progress America has made on race.

On the same day Donald Sterling, the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, was banned from the game for life for making racist comments, another story with more important racial implications was unfolding: A federal judge in Wisconsin struck down a law passed by that state’s Republican legislators that would have made voting harder by requiring state-approved photo identification at polling places.

More than 30 states have sought to impose voting restrictions over the past three years. Supporters of the measures claim they are aimed at preventing voting fraud. Critics say they are designed to disenfranchise, particularly black Americans and members of other minorities, and are the greatest threat since the Voting Rights Act was passed almost a half century ago….. Read More

The Inclusion Project at the UNC Center for Civil Rights is out with the second in a series of in-depth “State of Exclusion” reports that document the legacy of racial segregation in individual North Carolina counties. Last month’s initial report examined the situation in the southeastern county of Lenoir. The new one looks at the situation in the Piedmont county of Davidson. This is from the release that accompanied its release:

“According to a recent study by the Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy, Davidson County has the second most racially segregated schools in North Carolina, trailing only Halifax County. Read More

There’s a fascinating report published over the last week on both Charlotte-based Q-Notes and the national website Raw Story about the near-forgotten 1987 killings of three men in a Shelby gay adult bookstore.

Mug shot for Frazier Glenn Miller, a.k.a. Frazier Glenn Cross.

Mug shot for Frazier Glenn Miller, a.k.a. Frazier Glenn Cross

The article (click here to read) by Matt Comer and Todd Heywood of Q-Notes, an LGBT news outlet for the Carolinas, renews questions about the level of involvement of Frazier Glenn Miller, had with the Shelby killings.

Miller, 73, also known as Frazier Glenn Cross, is the white nationalist and former North Carolina KKK leader charged in the April 13 shooting deaths of three people at a suburban Kansas City Jewish community center and retirement home.

In Shelby on Jan. 17, 1987, police believe a trio of armed men burst in an adult bookstore, rounded up four customers and a clerk and then shot all five in the backs of the head, execution-style. The store was then set on fire with jugs of gasoline rigged with detonators.  Two of the victims survived the attack, with questions raised about whether the killings were a hate crime against the gay patrons.

A few months after the Shelby killings, Miller and other members of his White Patriot Party had been arrested in Missouri with a stockpile of weapons and charged with federal arms violations. At the time, the group was distributing a “Declaration of War” that gave a point system for killing black, gay and Jewish people, as well as abortion doctors, judges or “race-traitors.”

Read More