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If yesterday’s Mountain Moral Monday is any indication, North Carolina’s conservative political leadership may be beginning to feel a little uneasy about the movement they have awakened in this state.

When thousands of people turn out in the dog days of summer to protest the actions of lawmakers who’ve already adjourned for the year, you have to believe that this new movement for change really is here to stay. Moreover, as this story makes clear, the movement appears to be spreading beyond North Carolina.

 

 

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Pat McCrory 4Say what?!

Yesterday I had a conversation with Wilson Times reporter Janet Conner-Knox who read me a quote from Gov. McCrory that I simply could not believe I heard. This morning she reported it in this story. Here’s the excerpt:

“MORAL MONDAYS

McCrory said he has come out to hear what protesters are not happy about on the Moral Monday protests.

‘I go out in the crowd all of the time,’ McCrory said. ‘Frankly, yesterday I went out and talked to several of them and they were not very respectful. They did not represent the majority of those who call themselves moral by cussing me out. But that’s the way things go some times.’”

Got that? According to the Governor, he has been a regular attendee at Moral Mondays. Read More

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 Pat McCrory 4The momentum of protests against the reactionary policy choices of the General Assembly and Governor McCrory continues to grow and evolve. The latest example: today’s “Witness Wednesday” event at which eight courageous North Carolinians — two whom are wheelchair bound and one of whom walks with a cane — were arrested and handcuffed outside the state Senate chamber while another 150 or so supporters watched and sang hymns from inside the rotunda of the Legislative Building.

The hymn singing served as an especially poignant counterpoint to the droning and disingenuous explanation of the regressive House budget bill that Appropriations subcommittee chairs were providing on the House floor at the same time.  Sounds of the singing reached lawmakers and observers in the House gallery as a kind of muffled roar for several minutes that was occasionally punctuated by fleeting seconds of unfiltered sound every time a door was opened. 

The protests inside the Legislative Building were preceded by an energetic rally out front at which Read More

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Just released this afternoon….

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
21 February 2013

The NC NAACP once again urges Senators Burr and Hagan to help put an end to the historic exclusion of African American judges from the US District Court for the Eastern District in North Carolina with the pending appointment by the President. There has never been, in our history, a African American Judge on the bench in US District Court for the Eastern District of NC. The NC NAACP issued a letter to the Senators on October 25, 2011 urging the Senators to do the same. And on January 23, 2013 we wrote a private letter to the Senators, this time requesting a meeting to discuss the issue further. Senator Hagan has responded. However we are respectfully awaiting a response from Senator Burr’s office to schedule a meeting. We are now writing Senator Burr publicly with hopes that he will take the time to meet with civil rights leaders representing many of his constituents in NC before any decisions are made

We look forward to both a response for a meeting and for your efforts to right the historic wrongs when it comes to appointments to the US District Courts in North Carolina.

You can read the January letter by clicking here.

 

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The North Carolina NAACP renewed its call for gubernatorial pardons in the infamous “Wilmington 10″ case again today and the evidence they advanced in support of the demand was disturbing and compelling.

The following is from a release that accompanied this morning’s press conference:

RALEIGH – Newly discovered racist jury profiling by the Pender County Prosecutor Jay Stroud, shows shocking racial hostility toward prospective Black jurors. In his first effort to select a jury to convict ten young activists who had been charged with burning a Wilmington store, District Attorney Stroud ended up with ten Blacks and two Whites. Stroud felt “sick,” and asked for a mistrial. The judge agreed, and the trial was rescheduled for Pender County. Stroud got a list of about 100 prospective jurors, and he wrote racial comments beside most of their names.

 “We rarely get such direct evidence of prosecutorial racism in jury selection,” said Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II, President of the North Carolina NAACP. Read More