NC Budget and Tax Center

Revenue is up but North Carolina still falls short

Revenue remains up in North Carolina. This isn’t surprising as the national and state economies are growing. Revenue collections are expected to be $237 million above projections for this fiscal year, which is welcome news. However, as previously highlighted, this better-than-anticipated revenue does not mean we have adequate revenue to meet the needs and priorities of a growing state.

Costly income tax cuts enacted in 2013 greatly reduced revenue for public investment – reducing annual revenue by around $1 billon. Last year, state lawmakers passed more tax cuts that, once all tax changes are fully in place, will reduce annual revenue by more than $2 billion. These are dollars that otherwise would be available for public schools, affordable higher education, healthcare services for the elderly and poor, and helping ensure that economic growth extends to rural and distressed communities across the state.

The projected $237 million in better-then-anticipated revenue falls far short of what’s needed to adequately address challenges we face as a state. Getting average pay for North Carolina teachers closer to the national average, reducing Pre-K waitlists that totaled more than 7,200 children last year, helping promote economic growth in rural and distressed communities, and improving the states foster care system are among challenges that require additional state funding support. Many other challenges exist – ensuring affordable higher education and a growing elderly population – that have implications on the economic health and overall quality of life for North Carolinians.

While better-than-anticipated revenue is welcome news, such news does not serve as validation of costly tax cuts passed in recent years. Nor does this news mean that North Carolina is positioned for broadly shared economic prosperity in the years ahead. Rather, concern about whether our state will truly be able to keep up with the needs in a growing state that seeks to remain competitive and an attractive place to live should continue.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Looking beyond the surface regarding news that revenue is up in NC

Revenue is up in North Carolina—which is no surprise because the national and state economies are growing. But before jumping to the conclusion that tax cuts are the reason why, take a look at the numbers. Revenue collections for the first half of this 2016 fiscal year are higher than the same period last fiscal year, a report from the state’s controller’s office highlights. However, when compared to the same period for FY 2013, receipts from the personal income tax are down and receipts from the sales tax, which now applies to more goods and services, are up (see table below). This is the tax shift that state lawmakers put into motion in recent years.

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This tax shift – less reliance on revenue from the income tax and more from the sales tax – is an expressed desire of state leaders. Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

The Kansas experience visits North Carolina this week

Members of the Kansas Center for Economic Growth are visiting North Carolina this week to share what has happened in Kansas following massive tax cuts signed into law by Governor Brownback back in 2012. Kansas has become a case study of the grave consequences resulting from a dogged pursuit of tax cuts as an economic growth strategy. The results are not that good.

In 2012, Kansas enacted tax cuts that were considered among the largest ever enacted by any state. Tax cut proponents in other states – including North Carolina state lawmakers – held Kansas up as a model to be replicated. Accordingly, North Carolina state lawmakers followed Kansas’ path and passed huge income tax cuts in 2013 that largely benefited the wealthy and profitable corporations and significantly reduced available revenue for public investments.

For Kansas, the reality in the wake of the costly tax cuts has been nothing to write home about. Here are some low-lights of Kansas’ experience, accordingly to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

  • Deep income tax cuts caused large revenue losses. Kansas’ tax cuts last year cost the state more than 10 percent of the revenue it uses to fund schools, health care, and other public services, a hit comparable to a mid-sized recession. The revenue loss is expected to rise to 16 percent in five years if the tax cuts are not reversed.
  • The tax cuts delivered lopsided benefits to the wealthy. Kansas’ tax cuts didn’t benefit everyone. Most of the benefits went to high-income households and taxes were even raised for low-income families to offset a portion of the revenue loss.
  • Kansas’ tax cuts haven’t boosted its economy. Since the tax cuts took effect at the beginning of 2013, Kansas has added jobs at a pace modestly slower than the country as a whole. Furthermore, the earnings and incomes of Kansans have performed slightly worse than the U.S. as a whole as well while the number of registered business grew more slowly in 2013 than in 2012.

Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

Estate tax applies to wealthy, not small farmers and businesses

The ongoing, raging debate at the federal level regarding tax changes highlights the contrast between the proposals being put forward by President Obama and Congress for developing a budget and supporting the economy. The President would like to provide tax cuts to middle-income taxpayers – by enhancing the Child Care Tax Credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit, for example. Congress, by contrast, would like to repeal the federal estate tax, for example, which would benefit the wealthy.

The estate tax is essentially a tax on very large inheritances by a small group of wealthy heirs. An estate must have a value of $5.4 million (after related debt is accounted for) before the estate tax applies. Only the estates of the wealthiest 0.2 percent of Americans – roughly 2 out of every 1,000 people who die – owe any estate tax.

A repeal of the estate tax amounts to a massive windfall for those heirs. Proponents often claim that the estate tax hurts small farmers and businesses by forcing people to sell their family farm or business. In North Carolina we have heard this claim despite no evidence presented to support the claim. Still, proponents have continued to make the claim over the years, as Dean Baker at the Center for Economic and Policy Research notes. In the early 2000s, the American Farm Bureau Federation, a leading advocate for repealing the estate tax, could not cite a single example of a farm lost because of estate taxes.

North Carolina state lawmakers latched onto this false claim back in 2013 to repeal the state’s estate tax. Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

The awful gift that keeps on giving …

Senate Bill 20 passed another hurdle this morning, moving out of House Finance and to the floor for a full vote.  As I recently highlighted, state lawmakers are pursing tax changes that would further shift responsibility for paying for public investments and services to low- and middle-income taxpayers and away from the wealthy and profitable corporations.

Senate Bill 20 includes a provision that would no longer allow taxpayers to deduct expenses for tuition and related expenses such as course-related books, supplies, and equipment. The federal tax code includes this deduction, but state lawmakers are proposing that the deduction be done away with.

Eliminating this deduction would come at a time when North Carolina students and families have seen a steady increase in the cost of a college education. And this trend will likely continue, as another round of tuition increases look to be on the horizon for students attending public universities in the state. Meanwhile, state funding for need-based financial aid has not increased in recent years, meaning students likely have to incur increasing amounts of student loan debt. Read more