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These come from a recent University of California Alumni Association profile of economist Emmanuel Saez and his work that was linked to by the excellent online newsletter Too Much:

The top 1 percenters in the United States, for example, have seen their share of national income rise from under 8 percent in 1970 to just under 20 percent in 2010. A similar pattern is seen in Canada, which also adopted the same esprit de laissez-faire that made Reaganomics the hallmark of United States fiscal policy in the 1980s.

In contrast, over the same period, the top 1 percenters in Japan saw their share of national income inch up from 8 to 9.5 percent. French and Swedish plutocrats were similarly deprived. (Emphasis supplied).

Meanwhile, check out the following amazing graph of Census data that also comes from the folks at Too Much: Read More

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Inequality - long termThe good people at Inequality.org and the online publication Too Much do a great job each week of documenting America’s one-sided class warfare and the fast-mushrooming gap between the haves and have nots. If you’re not already a subscriber to their updates, click here to get signed up.

The graphic at left was featured in the most recent edition of Too Much and paints a remarkable picture of where the market fundamentalists appear bent on taking the country in the years to come.

Note: You might want to make sure that anyone you share it with this evening has a cold beverage close by to ease the pain.

 

 

 

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(Image: AFL-CIO / paywatch.org)

Just when you thought things couldn’t get much worse on the American inequality front, you encounter reports like the new “Executive Paywatch” report from the AFL-CIO.

Click here to check out the website — it includes a section in which you can view CEO pay by state. And while the top guys (and they’re almost all guys – 67 out of 69) in North Carolina aren’t as obscenely wealthy as they are in New York or Texas, the gap remains huge; the ratio of CEO pay to that of the average worker in North Carolina is 108 to 1.

 

 

 

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David Koch

Conservative plutocrat, David Koch

It’s no secret that America’s economic inequality continues to metastasize at a remarkable pace. Still, when one actually takes a moment to look at and consider the vast holdings of the nation’s richest families (and the avarice often represented therein) it can take your breath away. For some cases in point, check out the following article entitled “A Third of a Trillion for Three Families,” by tax lawyer Bob Lord for the website Inequality.org.

“How concentrated has America’s wealth become? In the not-so-distant future, if current trends continue, a mere handful of Americans will together hold over $1 trillion in wealth. Read More

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The folks at Pew Research released new poll results today confirming that Americans are increasingly sick and tired of the nation’s growing economic inequality and want government to do something about it. Even sizable percentages of Republicans favor strong action.

“There is broad public agreement that economic inequality has grown over the past decade. But as President Obama prepares for Tuesday’s State of the Union, where he is expected to unveil proposals for dealing with inequality and poverty, there are wide partisan differences over how much the government should – and can – do to address these issues.

The new national survey by the Pew Research Center and USA TODAY, conducted Jan. 15-19 among 1,504 adults, finds that 65% believe the gap between the rich and everyone else has increased in the last 10 years. This view is shared by majorities across nearly all groups in the public, including 68% of Democrats and 61% of Republicans.”

And while there is a significant partisan divide, overall majorities were large for some common sense solutions and assessments of the source of the problem: Read More