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Thom_Tillis_official_portraitWhen I last posted about the Senate debate between Speaker Thom Tillis and Sen. Kay Hagan I had listened to the exchange on radio but I had not yet watched the video. Watching television coverage of the debate one could hardly miss that Tillis was, once again, wearing a blue lapel pin from the science and advocacy organization Autism Speaks.

The pin highlights an important question that the media and voters should be asking Tillis: Where does he stand on minimum coverage requirements for insurance?

The primary argument Tillis pushes against the Affordable Care Act and Sen. Hagan is that the health law set a new floor for health insurance benefits. That’s why some plans were initially cancelled. It’s why some plans cost more than before the enactment of reform. But for the Autism community setting minimum standards for insurance was one of the most important parts of the Affordable Care Act. In fact, Autism Speaks and the Autism Society are still doing critical work to ensure that insurance companies are adhering to these new mandates.

Moreover, Tillis personally advocated for a bill expanding on the minimum requirements set by the ACA by mandating insurance coverage for the diagnoses and treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Assuming that Tillis was sincere in his support of new insurance requirements it’s difficult to see how he could object to the health reform law establishing similar mandates. And if he supports minimum requirements in general but opposes specific coverage mandates in the ACA then he should specify which services he would make optional for insurance companies. Would he say that insurers can go back to not covering pregnancy? What about prescription drugs?

The answers to these questions cut to the core of the Speaker’s opposition to health reform and voters need to know where he stands.

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While millions of dollars have been spent to tie incumbent U.S. Senator Kay Hagan to her support of the Affordable Care Act, there are now signs that Republican strategists may be moving away from making the health care law the singular issue of the 2014 campaign.

Think Progress reports it’s becoming increasingly difficult for some critics to keep up the drumbeat against the ACA:

‘Republicans called a House hearing on Wednesday with health insurance companies in an effort to embarrass the White House with revelations about double digit premium increases and claims that one-third of federal exchange enrollees still haven’t paid their health insurance premiums. Instead, the insurance leaders calmly explained that premiums for next year were still being calculated and that more than 80 percent of enrollees have in fact sent in their first-month checks.

One insurance company CEO even observed that while President Obama’s claim that if you like your health insurance plan you can keep it did not apply to everyone, the promise held true for “99 percent of our customers.” As The Hill observed, “Republicans were visibly exasperated as insurers failed to confirm certain assumptions about ObamaCare” and many simply exited the hearing.’

During Thursday’s confirmation hearing for Sylvia Mathews Burwell to head the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Senator Richard Burr avoided further attacks of the health care law, instead offering glowing remarks for President Obama’s HHS nominee. The New York Times reports:

‘Senator Richard M. Burr, Republican of North Carolina, said he intended to vote for Ms. Burwell because she had “a portfolio of experience that would make her a tremendous asset” to the Department of Health and Human Services.’

Political science professor David McLennan of William Peace University also sees the continued ACA attack losing some of its luster as the public becomes more comfortable with the law and the impact on their own lives.

“The question is: Will the Republicans continue that line of attack against Kay Hagan or try to find some other issues?  I think if they continue the Obamacare attack, it’s not going to be particularly effective.”

For a preview of McLennan’s weekend radio interview with NC Policy Watch’s Chris Fitzsimon, click below:

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Americans now appear to be evenly split in their opinion of the Affordable Care Act. A recent Christian Science Monitor/TIPP poll finds 47 percent of American adults support the law and 47 percent oppose it. But it’s worth noting public support has jumped seven percent from late March to late April, according to that poll.

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House Speaker Thom Tillis may have more name recognition than many of the other candidates in Republican U.S. Senate primary, but that has not translated into more support among voters.

New numbers released this week by Public Policy Polling find that Tillis leads the GOP field for the upcoming May 6th primary with 18% of the support among potential voters. That compares with 15% for Greg Brannon, 11% for Mark Harris, 7% for Heather Grant, 6% for Ted Alexander, 5% for Alex Bradshaw, 2% for Jim Snyder, and 1% for Edward Kryn.

And while 34% of voters remain undecided, PPP suggests Tillis would need to win most of them to reach the 40% mark and avoid a summer runoff.

Dr. Andy Taylor, a political science professor at N.C. State University, says Tillis has failed to breakaway from his Republican challengers, struggling to portray himself as the best candidate to unseat incumbent Democratic Sen. Hagan in November.

Taylor joins us this weekend on News & Views with Chris Fitzsimon to handicap the Senate race and discuss the role of big money in the political process.
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For those wanting to hear more from the candidates, Time Warner Cable News will broadcast an  hour-long debate April 22 at Davidson College featuring  all eight of the Republican challengers hoping for a chance to unseat Sen. Hagan.

Early voting for the May primary begins April 24th.