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Poverty continues to impact 1 in 5 North Carolinians, according to 2012 Census Bureau Data released last week. The extent of poverty would be far greater without the safety net and work supports, however. This post is part of a blog series that will explain how the new poverty data demonstrates the important role public programs play and the need for continued support. Read the other posts in this series on SNAP, Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, and the EITC.

As poverty continues to grow across many of North Carolina’s communities, Congress should reject federal budget policies that ask our poorest and most vulnerable citizens to bear the greatest load in putting our nation’s fiscal house in order. Congress needs to chart a course away from asking poor children, hungry seniors, and working families to solve our nation’s budget challenges on their own—through spending cuts to key investments in food assistance, early childhood education, and healthcare—and instead, take a balanced approach to the federal budget, one that includes new revenues and does not increase poverty.

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Human service agencies held a press briefing in Raleigh today to call attention to the ongoing (and growing) pain afflicting people in need as the results of the absurd acroos-the-board “sequestration” cuts enacted by Congress eralier this year.  WRAL.com has the story here.

This is from a press release distributed at the event:

As both houses of Congress continue to debate the next steps in the federal budget, non-profit groups from around the Triangle hosted a press conference Tuesday to address the extreme damage already done to working families in North Carolina due to automatic, across-the-board sequestration and to call for replacing sequestration with a balanced approach that includes new revenues. Read More

***This post was authored by Jelicia Diggs.

As Congress debates reforming the federal tax code, it is critically important to raise new revenues that can support our nation’s long-term economic recovery.  One excellent source of new revenues involves the billions of dollars in corporate tax loopholes, deductions, credits, and outright giveaways that allow too many multinational corporations to avoid paying their fair share of taxes.  This year, N.C. Policy Watch and the N.C. Budget and Tax Center are focusing on federal corporate tax reform as a means of highlighting a frequently under-reported fact: Namely, not all American corporations are paying the statutory tax rate and therefore are failing to support fiscal responsibility and the investments that are needed for a strong economy.

To underscore this message, we are shining a light on a number of corporate tax avoiders with strong connections to North Carolina by summarizing:

  1. the size and scope of their businesses,
  2. the taxes they have avoided paying in recent years, and
  3. the methods they use to accomplish this.

Click here to read previous profiles of Duke Energy, Merck & Co. and International Paper.

Company: DuPont

Background and North Carolina connections:

Founded over two centuries ago as a gunpowder mill, DuPont has grown into one of the top five largest chemical companies in the world. In fact, Fortune Magazine ranks Dupont as one of the nation’s “Most Admired Companies” and second in the world among chemical companies. DuPont is headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware.

DuPont is best described as a global science company that offers products and services in fifteen industries such as automotive, chemical, medical, and energy. With diverse industries in more than 90 countries, this company puts out to introduce hundreds of products and patents every year. In 1968 DuPont opened its fourth United States location in Fayetteville, North Carolina. The Fayetteville plant manufactures a variety of fibers, new films and specialty chemicals needed by businesses, the military, and consumers.  The Fayetteville location employs just over 900 employees.

Over the past several years, DuPont has experienced a successful recovery from the Great Recession, and is continuing to generate significant profits.  After cutting more than 17,000 jobs in 2010 due to the recession, DuPont has since managed to regain its dominant footing in the chemical industry. The company currently has more than 150 research and development centers and more than 70,000 employees worldwide and $49.7 billion in assets. Forbes.com reported last year that DuPont’s CEO Ellen Kullman has received an average compensation of around $9.7 million per year, for each of the last six years.

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Well, another Moral Monday is upon us, click here for information about the wheres and whens for today’s events in Charlotte, Burnsville and Manteo.

And speaking of Moral Monday, check out this editorial from Saturday’s Charlotte Observer about some of the cold, hard facts being lifted up by the MM protests.

And speaking of excellent editorial page content from over the weekend, check out this piece that ran in the Fayetteville Observer by former city council member and veteran activist Denny Shaffer, in which he explains the ultimate objectives of the state’s right-wing political movement.

And speaking of the disastrous impact of right-wing policies, check out this post by blogger extraordinaire Steve Benen about the slow motion wreck that is taking place across the nation as a result of the cuts inflicted by the absurd “sequestration” path forced by Congress.

And speaking of disastrous, slow motion cuts, activists will be rallying in Raleigh tomorrow to combat the ongoing demise of the minimum wage and the rights of fast food industry workers. The event will take place at 3:30 pm at Martin Street Baptist Church. RSVP by calling 919-604-8167 or emailing itsaredletterday@gmail.com.

And finally, speaking of people with whom such protests would have resonated, check out this tribute to the late Catholic Bishop Joe Gossman of Raleigh by George Reed of the Council of Churches. Oh, how the North Carolina Catholic community could benefit from someone of Gossman’s courage and progressive views today.

Tired of incessant delays during their flights home caused by the furlough of FAA air controllers, Congress voted last night and this morning to find the money to end the furloughs. About time.

Of course, the controller cuts have been far from the only stupid and counter-productive cuts brought on by that ultimate of inside-the-Beltway ideas/terms: “sequestration.”

Think Progress  has 12 more that you can read by clicking here.

Meanwhile, in a related vein, it seems worth noting that this morning’s editorial cartoon by Dana Summers of Tribune Media Services that appeared in the print edition of Raleigh’s News & Obsever  (you can look at it by clicking here)  is a classic example of what happens when ill-informed people rely on inaccurate and offensive stereotypes as the basis for their “opinions.” Thanks goodness our safety isn’t in the hands of intellectually lazy knuckleheads like Mr. Summers.