Archives

Jordan-Lake-Fall-1024x453

Jordan Lake – Photo credit: Wake Up Wake County

The North Carolina Chapter of the Sierra Club submitted comments today to the U.S. Army Corps of engineers about the idea of installing “solar bees” (i.e. big solar powered water mixers) to somehow clean up Jordan Lake rather than doing what’s really necessary. It’s worth your time to read.

 ”April 4, 2014

Mr. Justin Bashaw, Biologist
Environmental Resources Section
US Army Corps of Engineers, Wilmington District
69 Darlington Avenue
Wilmington, NC 28403-1343

Re: NC Chapter Sierra Club Comment on the Environmental Assessment (EA) for “A Demonstration Project Showing the Impact of Floating In-Lake Long-Distance Circulators in B.E. Jordan Lake” dated March 2014.

Thank you for this opportunity to comment on the Environmental Assessment for the pilot project to place 36 floating water mixers in Jordan Lake. The NC Chapter of the Sierra Club urges the Army Corps to not grant a USACE real estate license to the North Carolina Division of Water Resources (NCDWR) for placement of circulators within the Morgan Creek and Haw River Arms of Jordan Lake.

Jordan Lake needs science-based solutions to control pollution, not water mixers. And we have the science-based rules that will, based on modeling projections, lead to a cleaner Jordan Lake. Read More

Frank Tursi at the Coastal Federation posted a remarkable story yesterday that shines a light on two of the McCrory administration’s favorite practices: 1) turning down federal money that would promote the common good (and thereby sending it off to other states) and 2) sticking its head in the sand when it comes to our ever-more fragile natural environment. This is from the story:

“RALEIGH – Saying they don’t need the money to meet their new mission, state environmental officials recently turned down almost $600,000 in federal grants. The money would have been used to set up a network of sites to begin testing streams in the Piedmont where natural gas production is likely to occur and to establish a long-term planning and monitoring program to protect wetlands. Read More

From the North Carolina Sierra Club:

“Legislature ends session with Jordan Lake bills

Jordan Lake bills signal tough times ahead for troubled lake

RALEIGH – Early this morning, the Senate gave final approval to

SB 515, a measure to further delay the rules intended to clean up Jordan Lake. Jordan Lake is a drinking water supply for more than 300,000 people in the Triangle.  Over the three years of delay, more pollutants will run into the lake making it more expensive and difficult to clean up down the road.

“We have a plan in place to clean up Jordan Lake.” said  Molly Diggins, state director of the NC Sierra Club. “ But now lawmakers in Raleigh have needlessly delayed that plan. Instead, they are diverting more than a million dollars from other clean water projects to pay for a pilot project that will not address pollution flowing into the Lake.” Read More

More happy news for the environment in North Carolina: According to the one of the state’s most experienced and knowledgeable environmental policy experts, Sierra Club Executive Director Molly Diggins, today is likely to be an especially dark chapter in the ongoing effort to prevent the gradual transormation of Jordan Lake into a 22 square mile toilet as two destructive proposals await final legislative action.

Here is her take on Senate Bill 515 — a bill that awaits final approval in the House this afternoon:

“S 515, Jordan Lake Water Quality Act (House version) would violate the state’s 2007 agreement with EPA to reduce nitrogen and phosphorous coming into the lake, primarily from development.  Excess  nutrients promote algae growth, which kills aquatic and makes drinking water more expensive to treat. Read More

Longtime environmental advocate Molly Diggins of the Sierra Club offers the following take on so-called “solid waste reform” legislation scheduled for a final vote in the state Senate tonight:

“Tonight, the Senate will have a final (3rd) reading on S 328,  Solid Waste Management Reform Act.  S. 328 would undo many of the community, fiscal and environmental solid waste policies the state adopted in 2007. The 2007 measures were put into place after a one-year moratorium and comprehensive stakeholder process, including input from state and federal resource agencies. 

S 328 has had no associated studies and no stakeholder process.   Read More