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Perhaps the biggest news story of the week is the release of the Senate leadership’s budget proposal. Yesterday, the Budget and Tax Center provided an overview of what the budget pays for. Today, we took a close look at how it’s paid for.

How the state will raise the billions of dollars that fuel the state budget gets relatively little scrutiny compared to the rest of the budget. But because the Senate budget this year includes tax cuts for the rich, dramatically reducing resources to pay for vital services, it’s more important than ever to examine how the state will make up for the tax cut’s $770.2 million price tag in the next biennium.

Here’s what’s important for you to know about how the Senate pays for its FY2014 budget: Read More

A preliminary analysis of the Governor’s proposed budget by the experts at the N.C. Budget and Tax Center reports that: 

“The proposal was thin on the details for how and who would fund the spending priorities that were laid out.  The one revenue change supported by the Governor was the repeal of the state estate tax, a move that would result in the loss of $52 million.  Last year, just 23 multi-million dollar estates paid the state estate tax.  Because there was no significant change in availability, the budget is able to expand investments in certain areas by relying on spending cuts in other areas, tuition and fee increases, and the modest improvement in revenue collections to date. Below is a helpful graph to put the Governor’s proposal in perspective relative to what is needed to maintain current service levels or reach pre-recession levels.” Read More

Advocates for the disabled are hoping that Governor Bev Perdue and North Carolina’s legislative leaders can find a way to shore up the state’s Medicaid budget without resorting to more cuts.

Last week, media outlets reported that Republican budget writers declined to find $139 million for the projected shortfall, saying the issue was up to the governor to resolve.

The Arc of North Carolina wants to remove politics from this latest budget battle, and resolve the issue before the holidays.

Dave Richard, ARC’s Executive Director, sent a letter Friday to Governor Perdue, Speaker Thom Tillis, and  President Pro-Tem Phil Berger, asking that the three work together to avoid a “needless crisis” for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Here’s a excerpt of  Richard’s letter: Read More