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A preliminary analysis of the Governor’s proposed budget by the experts at the N.C. Budget and Tax Center reports that: 

“The proposal was thin on the details for how and who would fund the spending priorities that were laid out.  The one revenue change supported by the Governor was the repeal of the state estate tax, a move that would result in the loss of $52 million.  Last year, just 23 multi-million dollar estates paid the state estate tax.  Because there was no significant change in availability, the budget is able to expand investments in certain areas by relying on spending cuts in other areas, tuition and fee increases, and the modest improvement in revenue collections to date. Below is a helpful graph to put the Governor’s proposal in perspective relative to what is needed to maintain current service levels or reach pre-recession levels.” Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Across North Carolina and the nation at large, we’re seeing a fundamental policy debate playing itself out, which boiled down to its essence asks a single, critical question: Do government benefits promote dependency among those who receive those benefits, or do they promote personal responsibility and a common baseline opportunity for all Americans?

The big picture answer is that everyone benefits from our government’s spending on things like schools, roads, public health.  But the narrower part of this debate focuses on entitlement spending who receives it and what is required in exchange for these supports.  As a recent study makes clear, over 90% of entitlement spending benefits like Medicare, Social Security, and SNAP go to Americans who are either working, paying into the system, have paid into the system in the past, or have disabilities.  This spending provides a critical support that promotes the ideal that we’re all in this together.

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