2017 Fiscal Year State Budget, NC Budget and Tax Center

Initial review of Governor’s higher ed budgets that fail to ensure affordable higher education

Here are key highlights from Gov. McCrory’s proposed higher education budgets.

Community College System

Consists of 58 community colleges across the state serving all of North Carolina’s 100 counties.

The community college budget follows a larger trend of failing to boost public investment in the state’s education pipeline, with the exception of some additional funding for one-time bonuses, equipment upgrades, and a locally-driven initiative to promote post-secondary success. After years of steady increases in tuition, the proposed budget does not reverse this trend, failing to make post-secondary training and education at community colleges more affordable.

  • Funding provided for discretionary one-time bonuses, maximum $3,000, to selected state employees at NC community colleges ($29.4 million).
  • Savings recognized due to decline in enrollment ($26.2 million).
  • Funding provided for locally-determined support services to help ensure students earn a credential or degree ($16.6 million).
  • One-time funding provided to upgrade and maintain instructional equipment at NC community colleges ($7.5 million).

UNC System

Consists of 16 four-year public universities across the state serving more than 220,000 students, as well as the NC School of Science and Mathematics. Read more

2017 Fiscal Year State Budget, NC Budget and Tax Center

Inital review of Governor’s K-12 education budget: Falls short of ensuring public schools have adequate resources

Gov. McCrory’s proposed revised budget for K-12 education for the upcoming fiscal year maintains the status quo for public investments in public schools. Under the Governor’s budget, state funding per student remains well below pre-recession spending when adjusted for inflation and schools will continue to be hurting for resources.*

Teacher pay is just one thing on a long list that needs to be addressed so that public schools are able to deliver a top-notch education to all students. And while additional funding for pay increases for educators is much welcomed, this increase is largely delivered as one-time bonuses. As the only major component of the Governor’s education budget that is possible under the tax-cut constrained reality, it leaves far more needed to ensure every child’s access to a quality education.

Consequently, the Governor’s proposed budget once again challenges schools to do more with fewer resources and support despite heightened expectations regarding student achievement.

Here are key items in the K-12 education budget. Read more

News

Governor’s budget press conference short on details when it comes to teacher pay

26514179491_2290925c45_zWe’re still largely short on details when it comes to Gov. Pat McCrory’s proposed $22.8 billion budget plan. But when it comes to teacher pay, those who were critical of the governor’s overtures for a raise plan that again targets beginning teachers rather than the state’s veteran educators are likely to find more fuel after today.

In this video posted over at The News & Observer, you’ll get some explanation from McCrory’s budget chief Andrew Heath on the governor’s proposed plan. The full budget proposal should be released sometime next week, although most observers expect significant changes from the legislature, which reconvenes Monday.

As we reported earlier this month, the governor’s plan will focus on raises for beginning teachers that will bring the state’s average teacher pay up to about $50,000. Veteran teachers, it seems, can expect a $5,000, one-time bonus.

“Every teacher will get at least a bonus of 3 percent,” Heath said during Friday’s budget press conference. “For the younger teachers we’re getting them bigger pay increases and they’re getting the bonus on top of that. With the veteran teachers, we want to recognize their service by giving them a higher percentage of the one-time bonus, and that will be about $5,000.”

Of course, that explanation isn’t likely to soothe some critics like Christine Fitch, the N.C. State Board of Education’s local school board advisor, who lambasted the governor’s pay plan for veteran teachers earlier this month.

“Let’s not call this a raise,” said Fitch. “Call it what it is: a bonus. Tell them that you’re giving them a one-time bonus.”

More details on the governor’s budget as it becomes available.

NC Budget and Tax Center, Raising the Bar 2016

Sound fiscal policy choices needed to build a stronger, more inclusive NC economy

This post concludes a series on the state budget featuring the voices of North Carolina experts on what our state needs to progress so that all North Carolinians have a fair shot to get ahead.

State lawmakers will return to Raleigh next week to convene this year’s short legislative session. One primary task for lawmakers is to revisit the state budget for the upcoming fiscal year that begins in July and make needed and desired revisions. More tax changes may also be pursued, which would have implications on what the final state budget looks like and whether spending priorities to meet growing needs can be met.

raise the bar

The desire for more income tax cuts by state leaders would build onto tax changes passed in recent years that have largely benefited the wealthiest in the state and that have significantly reduced revenue available for public investments.

A recently released BTC report highlights the tax swap that has resulted from recent tax changes. Costly income tax cuts have given tax breaks to the wealthiest and profitable corporations. Meanwhile, the sales tax has been expanded to include more goods and services, which particularly harms families and individuals that struggle to make ends meet. Consequently, this tax swap – a greater reliance on sales tax and less on income taxes – has shifted the tax responsibility to low- and middle income taxpayers and away from the well-off. Since 2013, the tax burden on low income taxpayers has increased by $30 on average while it has decreased by around $15,000 on average for millionaires.

The significant revenue loss from the tax cuts cannot be overlooked. The annual revenue loss once all tax changes are fully in place is at least $2 billion. These are dollars that otherwise would be available for the economy-boosting public investments that have been lifted up in the Raise the Bar blog series this week – investments such as reducing persistent Pre-K waiting lists, ensuring that public schools have adequate resources, making higher education more affordable, ensuring healthcare services for the elderly and poor, and helping ensure that economic growth extends to rural and distressed communities across the state.

The results are clear: Even as the tax swap delivers big tax breaks to the wealthy, it reduces resources available for public investments that build a strong economy. North Carolinians should be alarmed by state leaders’ short-sighted focus on tax cuts and their desire to continue North Carolina down this path. Sound fiscal policy choices are needed to build a stronger, more inclusive economy and a brighter future that all Tar Heels want and deserve. It is this vision of building an economy that works for everyone that should guide lawmakers’ decisions during the upcoming legislative session.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Providing meaningful teacher pay raise clashes with appetite for tax cuts

Gov. McCrory and state leaders have signaled intentions to include a pay raise for North Carolina teachers in their respective proposed budgets for the upcoming fiscal year that begins July 1, 2016. The specifics of what a pay raise will entail remains unclear. However, what is clear is that providing educators a meaningful raise conflicts with tax policy decisions in recent years.  The priority placed on cutting income taxes for the wealthy and profitable corporations mean that movement to the national average for North Carolina’s teachers will be next to impossible and that progress on teacher pay could come at the cost of other classroom investments critical to students’ success.

The Governor’s proposed teacher pay raise will cost around $250 million but would not get average teacher pay to the national average and would fall short of even leading the southeast region. In addition, because of other priorities highlighted by the Governor – additional funding for broadband connection for schools and more funding to support students with disabilities, among other initiatives – a sustainable way to fund all of these critical investments in classrooms is unlikely. Accordingly, the Governor providing a way to pay for these proposals is critical to ensuring that they can be sustained. And that means revisiting the planned phase-in of reductions to the personal and corporate income tax rates in future years.

Tax cuts enacted since 2013 that largely benefit the well off and profitable corporations will reduce annual revenue by more than $2 billion once all tax changes are fully phased in. These are dollars that otherwise would be available to get average teacher pay for North Carolina teachers to the national average, boost investments in the state’s education pipeline (e.g. eliminate Pre-K waitlists, funding for classroom textbooks, etc.) and other public services. The constrained revenue picture as a result of costly tax cuts in recent years makes such opportunities merely wishful desires. And despite recent news of expected better-than-projected revenue for this current fiscal year, this does not mean we have adequate revenue to meet the needs and priorities of a growing state.

State leaders have expressed a desire to pursue more tax cuts that will further reduce available revenue and that will further make providing teachers a meaningful pay raise impossible – unless significant funding cuts are made to other areas of the state budget. The reality is that tax policy decisions in recent years and a desire to continue this tax-cut approach makes providing North Carolina teachers a meaningful pay raise fiscally unsustainable and unlikely to happen.