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NC Budget and Tax Center

If the Senate tax plan moves forward, it is very likely that many low- and middle-income taxpayers will see their tax loads increase .

The Senate plan, in addition to the House Plan, do not include the Earned Income Tax Credit, the best tool for ensuring that working low- and middle-income taxpayers are not carrying a heavier tax load than their wealthy neighbors. This decision by Senate and House leadership to end the Earned Income Tax Credit will impact more than 907,000 North Carolinians.

When you look at the Senate plan combined with the end of the state Earned Income Tax Credit and keep in place the local tax on groceries, it’s clear that low-income working families would pay more, while the rich pay less.BTC_Tax Shift Continues_Senate Tax Plan Read More

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Just in from the good people at LWV-NC:

League Opposes Tax Plans

The League of Women Voters of North Carolina, meeting in Charlotte for its 34th biennial convention, announced its opposition to tax plans now being considered in the General Assembly which promote unfair and regressive tax policies, including House Bill 998.  This opposition is in line with long-standing positions of the non-partisan organization.

The League, which led the successful state-wide campaign to repeal the tax on food in the 1990’s, expressed concern that the tax plans being considered in the General Assembly will actually impede, rather than deliver, economic growth, job creation and the quality of life for NC citizens. Read More

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As part of the generalized War on the Poor that they’ve been waging in recent weeks, state lawmakers have taken aim on the state Earned Income Tax Credit — an efficient program that provides workers earning low wages with a credit to offset their total state and local tax contributions.

Two new items documenting the folly of this action are worth a look this morning:

#1 is this op-ed in today’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer by Budget and Tax Center Director, Alexandra Sirota. As she notes:

“The EITC is an effective tool for keeping children and their families out of poverty, and it helps families keep working and on the path to the middle class.”

#2 is this new interactive infographic on the main Policy Watch site. It allows you to use your computer mouse to hover over any county in the state and get a glimpse of the credit’s impact.

Let’s hope state policymakers start paying attention to these compelling arguments.

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Be sure to check out the Fitzsimon File this morning, where Chris has some of the latest U.S. poverty numbers as well as data surrounding one of the country’s best anti-poverty tools — the Earned Income Tax Credit. Not surprisingly, given the tenor of the 2013 legislative session thus far, the state version of the credit is on the chopping block for conservatives running the General Assembly — i.e. the same folks who are already moving to repeal the estate tax (which only impacts a tiny fraction of the wealthiest estates in North Carolina).

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Today the Budget & Tax Center released a brief, “North Carolina’s Earned Income Tax Credit: A Support to Working Families with Widespread Benefits”, that presents county level data on the number of working families receiving the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Among the facts offered about the credit:

  • The state EITC provides workers earning low wages with a credit to offset their total state and local tax contributions. The state EITC was worth 5 percent of the federal EITC to a family claiming the credit in 2010.
  • Recently available data from the N.C. Department of Revenue show that more than 883,000 North Carolinians claimed the credit in 2010 and that they live in every county in the state.
  • National research on the EITC finds that the credit has reached nearly half of workers with children at some point and the majority received it for a short period of time.

Click here to read the brief and to see how the credit boosts the economies of each of the state’s 100 counties.