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The far right is pushing an ideologically-driven scheme to repeal North Carolina’s very modest 2007 renewable energy law just as it’s really starting to make a difference in jump-starting a homegrown sustainable energy sector. This morning’s Wilmington Star-News explains why backtracking would be big mistake:

“Why would a state intentionally limit its potential for economic growth? That was the probable result of a bill to eliminate a renewable-energy requirement that is nurturing the growing alternative-energy industry in North Carolina. Fortunately, some lawmakers in Raleigh apparently realize the damage the bill could do and have put the brakes on it, for now….

At a time when China and other nations are investing more in alternative energy sources and when demand for renewables is increasing, our state should not reject this currently small but thriving industry. If our leaders continually dwell in the present with no vision for the future, the result will be economic stagnation. Read More

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Back in the mid-1990′s, a newly-elected Republican legislator in the North Carolina House made his first order of business upon arriving in Raleigh to introduce a resolution that purported to repeal a resolution passed by the General Assembly in 1941. We are not making this up.

The arch-conservative lawmaker thought that it was critical that legislators revoke an endorsement their predecessors had given more than a half-century earlier near the outbreak of world war that had called for the establishment of some kind of successor to the failed League of Nations. The lawmaker was convinced that the long-ago resolution was somehow abetting the world’s slide toward one-world government.

Although the 1995 resolution actually passed the GOP-led House, it died in the Senate and was quickly relegated to the dustbin of conspiracy kook ideas.

Now, flash forward to 2012. Amazingly enough the conspiracy kook movement is now revived — this time in the disturbed ravings of Wake County Commissioner and quite-likely-soon-to-be U.S. Congressman Paul Coble. Read More