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Today’s big top-of-the-fold story in Raleigh’s News & Observer will be the subject of next Tuesday’s N.C. Policy Watch Crucial Conversation luncheon. As the N&O reports:

“Millions of dollars poured into North Carolina political campaigns in recent years in a futile attempt to keep the video sweepstakes industry legal – much of the money at the direction of a man later charged in Florida with racketeering.

The free-wheeling spending on politicians, lawyers and lobbyists has raised suspicions, although one probe, by the state elections board, found no campaign finance violations. Campaign and ethics watchdogs hope state or federal prosecutors will pick up the trail and investigate more deeply.

The elections watchdog group Democracy North Carolina, whose complaint prompted the two-year elections board inquiry, now wants the U.S. attorney and the Wake County district attorney to determine whether laws against corruption, bribery or other offenses were broken, and for authorities to take another look at potential election law violations.”

Come join us next Tuesday as we get the full scoop on this troubling and thus far under-reported story with the watchdog behind it — Bob Hall of Democracy North Carolina:

Bob HallSweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?
Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When:Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

RSVP today for next Tuesday’s Crucial Conversation luncheon:
Sweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?

Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy NC

It’s been almost a decade since the efforts of a determined group of nonprofit watchdogs, led by Democracy North Carolina Executive Director Bob Hall, helped expose the corruption of former North Carolina House Speaker Jim Black. In addition to driving Black from office, those efforts helped spur a number of improvements to state laws governing campaign finance, gifts to public officials, lobbying disclosures and many other important areas.

Now, however, corruption has reared its ugly head again and there are real questions as to whether the existing structure for enforcing state campaign finance laws can respond adequately to the challenge. As detailed in a letter Hall delivered to federal and state prosecutors earlier this month, several of North Carolina’s most important political leaders were the recipients of large and potentially illegal campaign contributions from individuals affiliated with the controversial “sweepstakes” industry in 2011 and 2012. Strangely and surprisingly, however, officials at the State Board of Elections chose not to follow up on Hall’s findings. Now Hall and his colleagues are appealing to the U.S. Attorney and Wake County District Attorney to take a second look.

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When: Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

NC Policy Watch presents a Crucial Conversation luncheon —

Sweepstakes industry corruption: How far does it go? What should be done?

Click here to register

Featuring Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy North Carolina

Bob Hall, Executive Director of Democracy NC

It’s been almost a decade since the efforts of a determined group of nonprofit watchdogs, led by Democracy North Carolina Executive Director Bob Hall, helped expose the corruption of former North Carolina House Speaker Jim Black. In addition to driving Black from office, those efforts helped spur a number of improvements to state laws governing campaign finance, gifts to public officials, lobbying disclosures and many other important areas.

Now, however, corruption has reared its ugly head again and there are real questions as to whether the existing structure for enforcing state campaign finance laws can respond adequately to the challenge. As detailed in a letter Hall delivered to federal and state prosecutors earlier this month, several of North Carolina’s most important political leaders were the recipients of large and potentially illegal campaign contributions from individuals affiliated with the controversial “sweepstakes” industry in 2011 and 2012. Strangely and surprisingly, however, officials at the State Board of Elections chose not to follow up on Hall’s findings. Now Hall and his colleagues are appealing to the U.S. Attorney and Wake County District Attorney to take a second look.

Join us as Hall explains his findings, what Democracy NC is asking prosecutors to do and the overall state of political corruption in North Carolina politics today.

Click here to register

When: Tuesday, August 25, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Uncategorized

videopoker2-08Will the new State Board of Elections be a genuine watchdog or a rubber stamp for political powers that be? Today’s initial meeting of the new group appointed by Governor McCrory should provide some interesting signals.

As Mark Binker reported earlier this week at WRAL.com:

“Aside from appointing new leaders, one of the first decisions facing the newly appointed board will be whether to proceed with an investigation into campaign donations from owners of electronic sweepstakes companies. Those companies are pushing for legislation that would legalize the gambling-like games.

Current board members have said they were ready to direct the staff to pursue an investigation of whether top leaders such as McCrory, House Speaker Thom Tillis, and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger received corporate contributions from a sweepstakes software provider. “

Here is a link to a summary of the complaint filed by Democracy NC about the very troubling sweepstakes issue, which among other things, involves Gov. McCrory’s former employer (a law/lobbying firm) and bundled checks to the Governor’s campaign.

Stay tuned.

Uncategorized

As the good people at Democracy NC point out in the lengthy statement below, the new controversey over an alleged racketeer with big campaign finance connections to North Carolina’s political power structure raises some important and disturbing questions:

Sweepstakes Gambling Operator is Top Donor to NC Legislators; Donations with Ties to McCrory’s Law Firm Raise Questions

The man at the center of a national gambling scandal that caused Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll of Florida to resign last week played a surprisingly large – and mysterious – role in financing North Carolina politicians in 2012, according to new research by the election reform group Democracy North Carolina: Read More