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NC Budget and Tax Center

Revenue is up in North Carolina—which is no surprise because the national and state economies are growing. But before jumping to the conclusion that tax cuts are the reason why, take a look at the numbers. Revenue collections for the first half of this 2016 fiscal year are higher than the same period last fiscal year, a report from the state’s controller’s office highlights. However, when compared to the same period for FY 2013, receipts from the personal income tax are down and receipts from the sales tax, which now applies to more goods and services, are up (see table below). This is the tax shift that state lawmakers put into motion in recent years.

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This tax shift – less reliance on revenue from the income tax and more from the sales tax – is an expressed desire of state leaders. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Today the General Assembly’s Revenue Laws Committee held its first meeting for 2016. The meeting’s agenda included presentations to state lawmakers on the committee from state officials regarding tax changes passed last year as well as proposed tax changes that state leaders would like to pass this year. Also included on the agenda was a presentation from a representative of the Tax Foundation (TF), tax policy research organization that favors tax cuts for profitable corporations and the wealthy, and recently released analysis that fails to acknowledge the cost of such an approach to North Carolina’s ability to fund public schools, infrastructure like roads and water/sewer, state parks or public health initiatives.

Here are three takeaways from today’s meeting.

  • Despite the TF spokesman informing that his organization’s assessment of the impact of tax reform in North Carolina uses hypothetical (a.k.a. made up) taxpayer scenarios, some lawmakers still pointed to these scenarios during the meeting to support their claim that the tax changes benefit all North Carolinians. This is not true. The TF spokesman even acknowledged during his presentation that all NC taxpayers do not come out ahead under tax changes since 2013.

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Commentary

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In case you missed it, be sure to check out today’s second installment in our new special report: “Altered State: How 5 years of conservative rule have redefined North Carolina.” “Public investment falls, tax responsibility shifts” is written by Alexandra Sirota of the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center and it documents the amazing shift that has occurred in how North Carolina funds government — a shift that has been engineered by the state’s conservative political leadership. Here’s the opening:

“Public investments are essential building blocks of long-term economic growth and shared prosperity. Decades ago, North Carolina diverged from its Southern neighbors by investing in good roads, quality public schools and universities and early childhood programs.

Since the official recovery began in 2009 — when rebuilding from the Great Recession would have been possible — state lawmakers have turned away from that tradition, choosing to sharply limit public spending in favor of tax cuts. Overall, state support for services in the 2016 fiscal year will be nearly a full percentage point below historic investment levels as a share of the economy.

"State spending as part of the economy — measured by state personal income — has consistently fallen in the past few years."— "A Summary of the Fiscal Year 2015–2017 Budget," BTC Reports, October 2014 (Source: N.C. Budget & Tax Center)

“State spending as part of the economy — measured by state personal income — has consistently fallen in the past few years.”— “A Summary of the Fiscal Year 2015–2017 Budget,” BTC Reports, October 2014 (Source: N.C. Budget & Tax Center)

In fact, state spending as a share of the economy — measured by state personal income — has fallen every year since 2009. The new budget continues this trend, and caps off the only period in more than four decades in which state spending declined as a part of the economy for more than five straight years.

The tax code has been radically transformed since 2010 in a way that makes adequate funding 0f core public services more difficult.

Click here to read the entire essay. And be sure to check back at the Altered State website tomorrow morning and each day through December 21. We’ll be rolling out new stories over the next two and a half weeks on everything from taxes to public education to environmental protection.

Commentary

As this week’s edition of The Weekly Briefing made plain, state leaders remain absurdly out of touch with the economic reality on the ground in North Carolina. The following announcement from colleagues at the N.C. Justice Center highlights this problem once more

Jobless workers struggle even as Division of Employment Security announces $600 million in tax cuts to employers
Employment remains more than 4 percentage points below pre-recession levels, according to October data 

Jobless workers continue to struggle with an economy that fails to provide enough jobs and an unemployment insurance system that is ill-equipped to deliver partial wage replacement to stabilize the economy, even as North Carolina’s Division of Employment Security announced $600 million in tax cuts to employers.

Employment levels as a share of the population remains more than 4 percentage points below pre-recession levels, according to today’s announcement on labor market conditions for October 2015.

Last month’s state employment rate was 5.7 percent, the same level as one year ago. However, the number of unemployed North Carolinians has increased over that period by 11,591 jobless workers. The national unemployment rate was 5.0 percent in October, dropping by 0.7 percentage points over the year.

“North Carolina should not be issuing tax cuts for employers when we have failed to reach what are generally agreed to be safe levels for our state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund,” said Alexandra Forter Sirota, Director of the Budget & Tax Center, a project of the North Carolina Justice Center. “Instead, our state policymakers need to re-balance their approach to ensure the system can deliver partial wage replacement to jobless workers and in so doing serve as a stabilizing force in the economy.”

Important trends in the October data also include:

  • The percent of North Carolinians employed is still near historic lows, and below the nation. October numbers showed 57.5 percent of North Carolinians were employed, leaving the state well below employment levels commonplace before the Great Recession. In the mid-2000s, employment levels reached a peak of about 63 percent. The percent of North Carolinians with a job remains below the national average, as it has been since the Great Recession.
  • There are still more North Carolinians out of work than before the Great Recession. There were more than 270,000 North Carolinians looking for work in October, almost 50,000 more than before the Great Recession.
  • North Carolina’s unemployment insurance system only provided temporary wage replacement to 22,545 North Carolinians. The number of jobless North Carolinians receiving unemployment insurance has dropped precipitously since 2013, ranking us 49th in the country on this measure and hindering the ability of the program to serve as a stabilizing force in the economy.

“North Carolina’s labor market is still too weak to ensure jobs are available for all those who seek employment,” Sirota said. “This affects all of us, as wages are falling short of the growth needed to boost the economy in the immediate and long-term.”

For more context on the economic choices facing North Carolina, check out the Budget & Tax Center’s weekly Prosperity Watch platform.

NC Budget and Tax Center

A report by the Tax Foundation, funded by the NC Chamber Foundation, gets it wrong in its assessment of the impact of tax changes made by state lawmakers in recent years. The plethora of charts and figures created by the Tax Foundation fails to detail the important loss of revenue that has hindered the state’s pursuit of important foundation-building for a strong economy—investments in schools, research and development, entrepreneurship and innovation. The assessment also masks the shift in tax responsibility to the majority of North Carolinians and away from the wealthy and profitable corporations.

Proclaiming that the state’s tax climate has leapt from one of the worst to now one of the best largely as a result of tax cuts provides no insight regarding the fiscal and economic health of North Carolina. Just as a good accountant understands that positive business earnings don’t equate to a financially sustainable enterprise, this reality also applies to tax policy and the economy. In fact, the Tax Foundation’s rankings reflect little more than the tax policies they and their corporate funders want to see rather than a robust body of evidence about what economies need to prosper. In fact, the pursuit of low-taxes has not been demonstrated to consistently deliver the economic returns promised.

Below are three notable takeaways from the Tax Foundation’s assessment of tax changes passed by state lawmakers since 2013. Read More