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NC Budget and Tax Center

When the General Assembly’s Revenue Laws Committee met this morning to continue efforts to fix various problematic aspects of the tax plan signed into law by Gov. McCrory earlier this year, there was one key takeaway that shouldn’t have surprised anyone: contrary to the claim by proponents that all taxpayers would benefit from the income tax changes, not all taxpayers will receive a tax cut. 

When asked by the committee to confirm that all workers will benefit from the recent income tax changes, a General Assembly Research Division staffer informed the committee that there will be winners and losers and that some North Carolinians will see their state income taxes go up. The fact that the tax plan would ultimately produce winners and losers was known and acknowledged by the Research Division and legislators throughout the tax reform debate, the staffer noted.

And this is just taking into account changes made to the personal income tax, not the sales tax.

When ALL tax changes – income AND sales tax changes – are taken into account, middle and low income taxpayers who make less than $84,000 (the bottom 80 percent of taxpayers) on average will see their total state and local taxes increase, creating a tax code that favors the wealthy even more than before. This is the reality of the tax plan.

Hopefully this response by the General Assembly’s Research Division will convince proponents of the tax plan to finally acknowledge that not all taxpayers will receive a tax break under the plan.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Proponents continue to make the claim that all North Carolinians will benefit from changes in the tax plan signed by Governor McCrory earlier this year. The reality is that the tax plan includes costly income tax rate cuts and the elimination of credits and deductions that will mean 35 percent of taxpayers will pay more in income taxes. When ALL tax changes – income AND sales tax changes – are taken into account middle and low income taxpayers with income below $84,000 (the bottom 80 percent of taxpayers) on average will see their total state and local taxes increase, making the tax code even more upside down.

One of the particularly common refrains is that families will be protected because the standard deduction is doubled. However, for many, the doubling of the standard deduction is not sufficient to make up for the loss of the personal exemption, the refundable state Earned Income Tax Credit and other deductions and credits. 

In fact, the first dollar of income is taxed sooner than under current tax law. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

The tax plan signed into law by Gov. McCrory earlier this year has been lauded by proponents as a major accomplishment during the 2013 legislative session. The tax plan, which cuts the state’s corporate and personal income tax rates, makes changes to the sales tax, and includes other tax law changes, reduces revenue for public schools and other public investments by more than $500 million over the next two years. By 2018, the tax plan reduces annual revenue by more than $650 million.

By chalking the tax plan up as a win for all North Carolinians, proponents fail to acknowledge the reality of fewer dollars for public investments and that the plan produces winners and losers. The tax plan does not represent a path toward shared prosperity for all North Carolinians, as BTC’s highlights in its analysis of the tax plan. Under the tax plan, taxpayers earning less than $84,000 a year, on average, will see their taxes increase and more than 65 percent of the net tax cut will flow to the top 1 percent of income earners in the state. 

Here are examples of taxpayers in North Carolina who are likely to see their total tax bill go up as a result of this plan. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

A majority of North Carolinians oppose tax cuts that put at risk the state’s investment in public education, a recent Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey shows. When presented with cutting funding for public schools in order to provide taxpayers a tax cut, 68% of North Carolinians oppose such a move.

The tax plan signed by Governor McCrory earlier this year reduced available revenue by $525 million over the next two years and revenue in future years is reduced even further. Benefits from tax cuts in the tax plan will largely flow to the wealthy and profitable corporations, which represent less than 10 percent of all businesses in North Carolina. Under the tax plan, the wealthiest taxpayers will see their taxes cut on average by more than $9,000, with top 1 percent of income earners getting 65 percent of the total net tax cut.

Opposition to cutting investments in public education to provide such tax cuts extends across ideology and political affiliation. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Today is the 78th birthday for Social Security, the flagship safety net initiative for our nation’s seniors, surviving spouses and children, and disabled workers.  Since first created in 1935, Social Security has kept millions of working Americans out of poverty, allowing them to live with dignity in difficult times of old age or the loss of spouses and parents.

As a new report from the Alliance of Retired Americans makes clear, the benefits of Social Security for North Carolinians in particular are obvious. Perhaps most notably, Social Security provided benefits to 1.2 million of our state’s seniors in 2012, effectively keeping almost 500,000 of them out of poverty. Almost 1 million of these recipients were women.

As Congress debates the future of the federal budget, it remains vitally important that seniors, children, and those with disabilities be protected from unnecessary and damaging cuts to the benefits provided by Social Security. Instead, Social Security needs to be protected and strengthened for future generations, and the best way to accomplish that goal is take a balanced approach to the federal budget, one that increases new revenues by closing the tax loopholes and special giveaways that allow corporations to evade paying taxes. According to Citizens for Tax Justice, more than $1 trillion in new revenues can be raised by closing these loopholes.

So on Social Security’s birthday, it’s important to remember: rather than ask Seniors and our most vulnerable to bear the brunt of reducing the federal budget deficit, it makes far more sense to take a balanced approach that raises new revenues through the elimination of these corporate loopholes.