Archives

News

A bill filed this week by Sens. Wells, Brock, Wade and Soucek would limit school employees’ political activities — and while it only pertains to what teachers can and can’t do during working hours, some are concerned the bill could keep teachers from speaking out altogether on issues they care about.

“I think it could have a chilling effect,” said Guilford County Spanish teacher Todd Warren in an interview with the Greensboro News & Record on Thursday. “Teachers aren’t the most politically active people anyway, but right now there are a lot of people who are afraid for their jobs if they speak out on some of these issues. This could just make that worse.”

Senate Bill 480 would disallow school employees from working on political campaigns during working hours, use the authority of his or her position to secure support or opposition for a political candidate, and use public funds to these ends. Read More

News

The Greensboro News & Record reported this weekend that the Houston Independent School District, which is led by former Guilford County schools chief Terry Grier, held another job fair for teachers at a hotel on Saturday.

Houston is offering starting teachers with no experience $49,100 — a far cry from North Carolina’s current base starting salary of $33,000 (some local districts offer salary supplements).

Depending on experience, Houston’s salaries could top $80,000 for some teachers. In North Carolina, base teacher salaries max out at $50,000.

“The bottom line is we have to provide for our families and provide for ourselves,” Jeff Roberts, a Thomasville teacher told media at a news conference to discuss concerns about teacher pay in North Carolina.

The lure of higher pay is pulling teachers away from North Carolina, harming the state’s future, Democratic leaders said at that news conference held outside the DoubleTree Hotel by Hilton.

Houston held job fairs for teachers twice in 2014, in Raleigh, Greensboro and Charlotte.

The National Education Association estimates that North Carolina will rank 42nd in teacher pay in 2015 — that’s with the average 7 percent pay raise lawmakers enacted last year and well below Senate leader Phil Berger’s estimation that the pay bump would bring North Carolina up in the rankings to 32nd.

Read more about the Houston job fair for teachers over at the News & Record.

Commentary

People_16_Teacher_BlackboardA new study, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research indicates that the much-debated Teach for America program (TFA) is not creating more effective or successful teachers. The study shows that test scores for students taught by TFA teachers in their first or second year of teaching  are on par with those taught by traditionally certified teachers. These data contradict previous studies which had indicated that students taught by TFA teachers scored higher in math than their peers taught by traditionally certified teachers.

The Mathematica study was conducted in order to evaluate the program (which recruits college graduates and trains them to work in low income schools) in the years since it received federal funding to expand in 2010. The purpose of the TFA program is to expand the pool of highly intelligent and motivated teachers, thereby increasing the opportunities for low income students. The trouble, however, is that TFA teachers are given only five weeks of training and then often thrown into classrooms with little or no administrative support.

The new study shows that TFA teachers don’t have a problem with teaching but are very unsatisfied by their influence over school policies and the lack of support from school administrators. Also, in perhaps the most damning finding, researchers found that most TFA teachers have no intention of sticking around past their two year commitment to TFA. The study shows that 87.5 percent of TFA teachers in their first two years say that they do not plan to spend their career in the classroom. Twenty-five percent said they planned to quit at the end of the current year. While TFA has never released figures, its leaders have always insisted that the majority of teachers finished the two year program and many stay on past the program. This study definitely tells a different story.

Read the study in its entirety here http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/~/media/publications/pdfs/education/tfa_investing_innovation.pdf

News

In 2011, the North Carolina General Assembly eliminated the much-lauded NC Teaching Fellows program, which prepares and provides for students eager to enter into a teaching career in their home state. As the last of the Teaching Fellows are set to graduate this spring, the program’s sponsor has released a retrospective report on the program’s impact since its inception in 1986.

“With declining enrollment in teacher preparation programs at our state’s colleges and universities and increasing numbers of teachers retiring, moving to other states or leaving the classroom altogether, the loss of this highly effective teacher recruitment effort will certainly be felt across North Carolina” said Keith Poston, President and Executive Director, Public School Forum of North Carolina.

Since it began, the [North Carolina Teaching Fellows] has graduated 8,523 Teaching Fellows, 79 percent of whom were employed in the public school system at least one year after completing their initial four-year teaching service requirement and 64 percent still in the public school system six or more years after completing the scholarship program’s service requirement.

Read More

Commentary

A post today at the website Higher Education Works neatly cuts through the b.s. today on the issue of what North Carolina must do to address the shortage of quality schoolteachers – now and in the future:

Commentary: Teacher shortage? Pay them.

North Carolina faces a looming crisis – a shortage of teachers. But putting and keeping great teachers in the classroom isn’t rocket science.

Pay them.

Gov. Pat McCrory likes to point out that North Carolina is now the 9th most-populous state in the nation. The governor also talks about responding to the marketplace. Markets are about supply and demand.  And as our population grows, the demand for education is not subsiding in North Carolina. Far from it.

Yet the market indicates that not enough public university students – or their parents – think education pays enough to justify a career in teaching. As North Carolina approaches 10 million people, enrollment in the state’s public schools of education is down 27% over five years. Enrollment declined 12% from 2013 to 2014 alone.

Ellen McIntyre, dean of the School of Education at UNC Charlotte, told the UNC Board of Governors recently that the crisis over teacher pay that ranks near the bottom in the nation has given would-be enrollees “a little bit of a pause.”

While a starting salary of $33,000 might sound acceptable to an 18-year-old, McIntyre said, “It’s their parents who don’t want them to go (into teaching). It’s their parents who are dissuading them from going into schools of education.”

Raises state legislators approved for teachers last year were tilted toward the bottom end of the pay scale. To his credit, McCrory supports raising starting teacher pay to $35,000. The governor also supports pay supplements for teachers with advanced degrees or who teach in high-demand fields or impoverished school districts.

“That’s adapting to the marketplace,” he said. “Sometimes the marketplace requires you to pay more to certain teachers if they’re willing to teach in areas where others don’t want to teach.”

Over the past year, a subcommittee of the UNC Board of Governors – which oversees the 17-campus university system – developed seven recommendations to improve teacher preparation in UNC system schools. They include: Read More