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The pay for presidents of public universities is rising, with the median salary for the president of a public university now $428,250.

That’s an increase of 7 percent, while two presidents in the nation (at Pennsylvania State University and Texas A&M) made more than $1 million, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, which released its annual survey of public college presidents this week.

UNCsystemUniversity of North Carolina system President Tom Ross made $543,725 during the 2014-15 school year, according the Chronicle analysis. N.C. State University Chancellor Randy Woodson made $520,000, as did UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol Folt.

Scott Ralls, the outgoing head of the state’s community college system, made $286,954.

In an article about the Chronicle’s findings, the New York Times pointed out that not all college presidents want that higher pay.

The University of Texas’ incoming president turned down a $1 million base salary, asking instead for $750,000 out of concern of how the higher pay would be perceived by students, faculty and the state legislature.

The paycheck for the top job at UNC is likely to increase from Ross’ current salary, after the UNC Board of Governors moved in April to allow for salaries up to $1.1 million for the new president as well as increased pay for chancellors.

The board is in the midst of its search for a new president of the 16-campus system, after Ross was pushed out in January by the politically-appointed board for reasons that have still not been explained. Ross will stay in his position until January.

Pay, and the ability to offer more money to job candidates, has been mentioned by some board members as a necessary tool to recruit UNC’s next leader.

The decision to allow for more pay for top executives in the university systems comes after several years of deep cuts handed down to the university system by the state legislature, and as faculty and staff have seen little change in their salaries during the course of the recession.

There may be some salary increases for UNC employees, however. The House version of next year’s budget has a 2 percent raise proposed for university system staff and faculty.

The Senate is expected to release its version of the budget in coming days, though Senate leaders have said to expect a significantly smaller budget than what their colleagues in the House prepared.

So, what do you think? Should North Carolina be paying its top university leaders what it does? How much does salary matter when it comes to recruiting for top university jobs?

News

The Nation became the latest national media group to offer its thoughts on the changing direction of the University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors, with the publication today of “How A Right-Wing Political Machine is Dismantling Higher Education in North Carolina.”

The progressive magazine took aim at recent decisions like the firing of UNC president Tom Ross and the controversial closure of three academic centers, as well as recent pledges to look at “right-sizing” the entire public university system.

From the article:

But just as pertinent as the question of what should be taught at UNC is the question of whom. Since its founding in 1789 as America’s first public university, UNC has fought to preserve the “public” part of its mission; high-quality education plus low tuition has kept more students in-state in North Carolina than anywhere else in the country. Now the board appears to be dismantling the system’s ability to fulfill that goal.

In response to deep cuts to state funding, the board has approved a series of tuition hikes—in-state students will pay 4.3 percent more next year on average—while imposing a cap on financial aid that may impact nearly 22,000 low-income students next year. Governor McCrory has suggested that schools compensate by limiting enrollment to “those who are ready for college,” a distinction that smacks of euphemism. Despite these austere times, the board voted in April to boost the salaries of top administrators to as much as $1 million a year.

The goal, apparently, is not only to put Ayn Rand into the hands of students but also to force UNC into the sort of economic order she envisioned. It matches the agenda that the legislature and McCrory have advanced throughout the state with the backing of the Pope network: cut taxes for corporations and the wealthy, and use the resulting revenue gap to justify the evisceration of safety net programs like unemployment insurance, and public institutions like schools. “You can’t separate what’s happening at the Board of Governors from what’s happening in the legislature,” Gene Nichol said over the phone in March. “They govern for the white, wealthy, straight Christians, mostly for the males, and all the rest be damned.”

“We’re capitalists,” explained Steven Long, a former Civitas board member who now sits on the Board of Governors, after the body voted in May to cut dozens of academic programs across the system. “We have to look at what the demand is, and we have to respond to the demand.”

You can read the entire piece here.

 

News

Note: As has been reported below, the degree discontinuations do not necessarily mean the opportunities to study in these areas are going away. Many of the programs are being consolidated into similar majors or degree offerings.

The University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors decided at its meeting last week to whittle down the types of degrees offered at various campuses.

UNCsystemThe culling came from a combination of campus requests and a regular system-wide review of programs with low enrollments that’s conducted every two years.

The discontinuations don’t necessity mean the opportunity to study in those areas are going away. Many of the degrees being cut were absorbed into other majors, with concentrations offered.

At East Carolina University, for example, individual undergraduate degree programs for French, German, German K-12, French K-12 and Hispanic Education will be consolidated into a single degree of Foreign Languages and Literature.

At the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, students can still study in the specialized education areas, their degrees are just being combined with similar degree offerings.  The bachelor’s degree program in child and family development is being absorbed into a nearly identical major, where participants also earn a license. (Previously, students had the option of not receiving a license, an option for students who wanted to work in daycare setting which don’t always require licenses.). Also, the master’s degree offering in special education, adapted, is being merged into a more general master’s program in special education.

Many of those being cut and combined into other degrees are educational training programs, with the review noting that out of the 221 degree programs with low enrollments, 46 of those were related to education.

That’s part of an ongoing issue that the UNC system and state education leaders are grappling with, given a 27 percent drop from 2010 to 2014 of those wanting to pursue teaching as a career. The situation, many fear, could lead to a teacher shortage in the state.

The 46 degrees being discontinued are below (information from UNC report on academic degree productivity):

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Please note, that many of the programs are simply being merged into more general degree offerings, with the educational offerings remaining the same.

To read the entire report about the degree discontinuations, click here.

The board also appointed two new chancellors last week – state Medicaid director Dr. Robin Cummings became the new head of the University of North Carolina-Pembroke campus, while the University of North Carolina at Greensboro found out its new chancellor is Franklin Gilliam Jr., a public affairs dean from UCLA.

News

The N.C. House of Representatives released portions of its budget Thursday, and included several significant changes and some cuts for public higher education.

UNCsystemThe entire budget – which is expected to fill in gaps about whether raises are in store for state employees and teachers – is expected to be released Monday, and voted on by the Republican-led House that week.

Senate Republican leaders have not announced when their version of the budget will be done.

Several significant changes were trotted out by House budget writers this week for the state’s public higher education system.

The House did fund expected growth in the system but also calls for $44.3 million over the next two years in management cuts and would roll out a program that would push academically weak college students into a community college program before gaining entry into the state’s four-year universities.

Drew Moretz, the University of North Carolina system’s vice-president for government affairs, said the House calls for fewer cuts than what Gov. Pat McCrory’s budget proposed.

“It’s a better starting point than what the governor had given us,” Moretz said.

The system as a whole has had $658 million in management cuts since 2008-09, he said.

The House budget would also, for the first time, allow low-income students to get scholarships to virtually attend Western Governors University, an online education program that’s been touted as a low-cost education option by groups like the conservative John William Pope Center for Higher Education Policy.

House lawmakers also want to delay more than 1,000 prospective students from attending the state’s public universities by requiring the UNC system to defer admissions to students who meet admissions standards but don’t have strong academic histories

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Commentary

In case you missed it earlier today, be sure to check out this new and sobering release from the Justice Center on the sorry state of North Carolina’s investment in higher education:

North Carolina’s spending on higher education cut deeply since 2008
Shortchanging public universities and colleges reduces access to higher education, hurts economy

RALEIGH (May 13, 2015) — Even as most states have begun to restore funding for higher education that was cut during the recession, North Carolina has continued to cut funding for public universities, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.  As a result, tuitions have risen dramatically and the quality of education here has suffered, which will make it harder for the state to attract businesses that rely on a well-educated workforce.

“Smart investments in public colleges and universities will help to strengthen North Carolina’s economy,” said Cedric Johnson of the Budget & Tax Center, a project of the NC Justice Center. “Communities with highly educated residents attract employers who pay competitive wages. Their employees then spend money in their community, boosting the economy of the entire area. That’s what North Carolina needs as our economy continues to recover from the damaging Great Recession.”

Nationwide, states are spending 20 percent less per student on higher education than they did in 2008, after adjusting for inflation. With such deep cuts in higher education investment, colleges and universities have had to raise tuition, cut spending, or both. As a result, tuition at four-year public colleges has grown nationally by 29 percent since the 2007-08 school year.

For North Carolina, costly tax cuts in recent years have hindered the state’s ability to invest in what works, such as its well-regarded public university system. State funding for higher education has been cut by more than 20 percent since 2008 when adjusted for inflation, according to the new report. Meanwhile, the average tuition at a public, four-year college increased by 36 percent during this period. Read More