As this week’s edition of The Weekly Briefing made plain, state leaders remain absurdly out of touch with the economic reality on the ground in North Carolina. The following announcement from colleagues at the N.C. Justice Center highlights this problem once more

Jobless workers struggle even as Division of Employment Security announces $600 million in tax cuts to employers
Employment remains more than 4 percentage points below pre-recession levels, according to October data 

Jobless workers continue to struggle with an economy that fails to provide enough jobs and an unemployment insurance system that is ill-equipped to deliver partial wage replacement to stabilize the economy, even as North Carolina’s Division of Employment Security announced $600 million in tax cuts to employers.

Employment levels as a share of the population remains more than 4 percentage points below pre-recession levels, according to today’s announcement on labor market conditions for October 2015.

Last month’s state employment rate was 5.7 percent, the same level as one year ago. However, the number of unemployed North Carolinians has increased over that period by 11,591 jobless workers. The national unemployment rate was 5.0 percent in October, dropping by 0.7 percentage points over the year.

“North Carolina should not be issuing tax cuts for employers when we have failed to reach what are generally agreed to be safe levels for our state’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund,” said Alexandra Forter Sirota, Director of the Budget & Tax Center, a project of the North Carolina Justice Center. “Instead, our state policymakers need to re-balance their approach to ensure the system can deliver partial wage replacement to jobless workers and in so doing serve as a stabilizing force in the economy.”

Important trends in the October data also include:

  • The percent of North Carolinians employed is still near historic lows, and below the nation. October numbers showed 57.5 percent of North Carolinians were employed, leaving the state well below employment levels commonplace before the Great Recession. In the mid-2000s, employment levels reached a peak of about 63 percent. The percent of North Carolinians with a job remains below the national average, as it has been since the Great Recession.
  • There are still more North Carolinians out of work than before the Great Recession. There were more than 270,000 North Carolinians looking for work in October, almost 50,000 more than before the Great Recession.
  • North Carolina’s unemployment insurance system only provided temporary wage replacement to 22,545 North Carolinians. The number of jobless North Carolinians receiving unemployment insurance has dropped precipitously since 2013, ranking us 49th in the country on this measure and hindering the ability of the program to serve as a stabilizing force in the economy.

“North Carolina’s labor market is still too weak to ensure jobs are available for all those who seek employment,” Sirota said. “This affects all of us, as wages are falling short of the growth needed to boost the economy in the immediate and long-term.”

For more context on the economic choices facing North Carolina, check out the Budget & Tax Center’s weekly Prosperity Watch platform.


unemploymentThere was a fine op-ed in this morning’s edition of Raleigh’s News & Observer by an unemployed man from Salemburg named Bobby Parker about the sorry state of North Carolina’s bottom-of-the-barrel unemployment insurance system. And make no mistake; it is sorry. As a result of legislation passed in 2013, North Carolina’s once middle-of-the-pack system is now near the bottom in the nation in just about every category.

Consider the following stats from the U.S Department of Labor:

• Only 15% of the unemployed received benefits for the first quarter of 2015. This was 47th in the country.
• NC has an average weekly benefit amount of $231.30/week which ranks us 47th in the country.
• The average duration of benefits is 12.9 weeks, which ranks us 45th in the country.

Here is where things stood before the changes contained in House Bill 4 hit:

• 39% of the unemployed received benefits during the second quarter of 2013. This placed 24th in the country.
• NC had average weekly benefit amount of $301.06 which ranked 25th
• The average duration of benefits was 15.9 weeks, which ranked us 31st.

But wait, as Mr. Parker (and yesterday’s Progressive Voices contributor Steve Ford) explain, things are about to get worse. It turns out that even with the precipitous fall documented above, state lawmakers want to demand more from the unemployed by increasing their work search requirements. Here’s Mr. Parker:

“Now, state leaders want to make sure that you’re not sitting on your duff lapping up that $350 to lavish on, say, utilities to power your Internet job search, gas to get you to an interview or … food?

So they’re ready to require the unemployed to make and record at least five contacts per week with potential employers. Currently, the state requires two such contacts per week.

Simple and reasonable enough? Well, yes, it would be if those contacts were likely to be productive. But even with the current mandate of two, I find myself applying for jobs that I know I’m not going to get because I don’t have the experience or skills that match the available work.”

As Ford explains, the bill to make this all happen now sits on Governor McCrory’s desk awaiting his signature. He has until next Thursday to decide what to do — thus making it almost certain that not only will North Carolina make its scrooge-like system even stingier, it will do so during the week that is designed to honor workers of the nation. All in all, it’s an apt gesture from a group of politicians who almost never miss a chance to remind average workers of how little they are valued.


As state leaders deride the unemployed as lazy good-for-nothings and slash their insurance benefits, the news about finding a job job remains discouraging for a large swath of North Carolinians. Here’s the latest sobering news about the “Carolina Comeback” from economist Patrick McHugh:

“Unemployment is still a major problem in North Carolina. The headline unemployment rate has inched up from 5.3% to 5.9% since the beginning of the year, but that still doesn’t tell the whole story. When people who have been forced out of the job market since the Great Recession by a lack of job openings are included, the actual unemployment rate is still in double digits, almost twice what is commonly reported. This gap between the official unemployment rate and the reality on the ground can skew the policy conversation, making it look like the good times are back when that’s not really the case.

The US economy has improved since facing down the prospect of complete collapse a few years ago, which has buoyed employment prospects in North Carolina. However, any talk of a complete recovery is grossly overstated. There are likely more than 230,000 North Carolinians who would like to work, but don’t show up in the official figures. When those “missing workers” are included, the total tally of North Carolinians who can’t find a job rises past half a million. Read More


unemploymentVeteran Raleigh News & Observer political reporter Rob Christensen, a confirmed centrist who has sometimes frustrated progressives down through the years with his extremely high tolerance for conservative policy blather, is right on the money this morning with a new and powerful takedown of the state’s Scrooge-like unemployment insurance policies.

In addition to explaining and dissecting the state’s U.I. system and the recent conservative-designed changes that have made it the “stingiest…in the country” in succinct terms, Christensen takes an important  extra step and speaks from the heart in the conclusion to his essay:

“So why are our political leaders behaving this way when most of their constituents punch a clock or fill out a time card?

Here are several thoughts. Businesses bankroll most of the legislator’s campaigns and finance a battery of lobbyists on Jones Street. There is almost no one to speak for people who get laid off.

There is also a view among some conservatives that unemployment insurance is, in the words of the Civitas Institute, “paying people not to work.’’

This view, I might add, is contrary to my life experience. Three of my grandparents worked in a textile mill. My father was a factory worker. I worked in a textile mill and other manufacturing plants in my early years.

I have known lots of hard working people – family, friends, neighbors, and colleagues – who have been laid off. It is a terrifying experience. You don’t know how you will take care of your family or meet your mortgage payments. Often your self-esteem takes a beating. The modest amount of unemployment insurance doesn’t even begin to cover living expenses.

There are apparently some people who believe the American worker is a slug just waiting for a chance to sit on his or her duff. I think they are wrong. I believe most Americans just want a chance to earn a decent living.”

Click here to read and share the entire column. It deserves it.



As we noted in this space yesterday morning, there were some things to like in Gov. Pat McCrory’s State of the State speech Wednesday evening. For the most part, the Governor sounded more like good ol’ Moderate Mayor Pat rather than the champion of reactionary change who signed some of the nation’s most extreme legislation during his first two years in office.

Still, there were moments when Ebenezer Scrooge McCrory was on display — perhaps most notably when he talked about unemployment insurance and workers’ compensation. In both segments, the Governor’s message was as clear as it was callous and offensive: the Governor believes (and his policies are premised on the notion) that large numbers of North Carolina workers are lazy and don’t want to work.

How else to explain his crowing about having enacted the harshest unemployment insurance cuts in U.S. history and then repeatedly professing a desire to create jobs for all who “want to work”? And if one had any idea that these repeated references were simply an awkward if unnecessary nod to retired folks and, perhaps, the disabled, these were pretty thoroughly trashed when the Governor went off on a lengthy diatribe about how his “examination of workers compensation estimates that 40 percent of workers costs are related to abuse or outright fraud.”

Say what, Governor? Do you really believe that large numbers of people don’t want to work and that that’s why some were surviving on unemployment insurance during the Great Recession? Do you really believe that two out of five worker’s comp claims are bogus?

If so, perhaps you should have checked ahead of time with Rep. Jason Saine. Saine, of course, is the GOP state lawmaker who only managed to get off unemployment insurance by getting elected to the House of Representatives.

Or, perhaps he could have talked with one of the state’s most respected and experienced worker’s comp lawyers — Raleigh’s Leonard Jernigan. As reported this morning: Read More