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A for-profit online education company will be at the legislature tomorrow to give a pitch to lawmakers about the virtual public charter schools it runs, and profits from, in more than 30 other states.

An executive from K12, Inc., a Wall Street-traded company that gets the bulk of its revenue from running online public schools, is slated to make a presentation Tueaday at the Joint Legislative Education Oversight committee. The hearing begins at 10 am. Tuesday in room 643 of the Legislative Office Buildling.

(Steaming audio of the meeting will be available here, and a copy of the commitee’s agenda is here.)

Mary Gifford, the company’s senior vice-president for education policy scheduled to speak to lawmakers, also spoke last week in front of a virtual charter school study group assembled to craft recommendations for the State Board of Education of how the online-only schools should operate in North Carolina.

At that meeting, Gifford acknowledged low graduation and performance rates K12,Inc.-run schools have had in other states, saying that the company’s schools tend to attract low performing students and the home-based system of education can do little to help those high-school students.

“High school is a nightmare,” Gifford told the virtual charter study group last Tuesday. Forty percent of the students in high school will be very successful.”

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North Carolina or other states opening up online charter schools should put enrollment caps and other limits to ensure focus is kept on quality education and not profits, a board member of Colorado online charter school said recently.

“We’re not interested in being the biggest,” said Brian Bissell, the board chair of the Colorado Virtual Academy (COVA), an online school that recently moved to distance itself from the for-profit K12, Inc. that ran the school. “We want to deliver a high quality education.”

The Colorado Virtual Academy, one of the largest online-based schools run by K12, Inc , decided this month to take back the school management functions from the Wall Street-traded online education company that runs public charter schools around the nation.

Bissell, whose three children attend the K12-run school, spoke with N.C. Policy Watch about why the board decided to scale back its relationship with K12 and gave some advice for states that have yet to see the controversial school option open.

North Carolina doesn’t currently have any online, or virtual, full-time schools, which allow students from kindergarten through high school to take their entire caseload through online interactions with teachers through their home computers. The state-run North Carolina Virtual Public School allows students around the state to take individual classes online, either to catch up with their peers or take advanced classes not offered in their home counties.

K12, Inc. is a national leader in the online education industry, but has been criticized for methods that critics argue aggressively putsprofits over quality and doesn’t serve students well. K12, Inc. defends its business, saying that the online option works for many families and that the low academic standings are partly attributed to a population of students that come to K12 at academic disadvantages. Read More