Archives

Uncategorized

NPR has a story today detailing some challenges faced by voting-eligible Asian American citizens.

From name confusion by officials to communication barriers, frustration and other difficulties may discourage or deny the rights of eligible voters.

Enacting Voter ID legislation in North Carolina will prove to be detrimental to the voter rights of minority communities in the state.

Uncategorized

A unanimous three-judge panel at the U.S. Court of Appeals — including a George W. Bush appointee — struck down Texas’ discriminatory voter ID law today. You can read the opinion by clicking here.

According to Reuters, the judges said that  

“the evidence showed the law’s impact would ‘fall most heavily on the poor and that a disproportionately high percentage of African-Americans and Hispanics in Texas live in poverty.'”

Are you paying attention Thom Tillis?

 

Uncategorized

Think Progress has an amazing, but not terribly surprising story about the impact of the mandatory photo ID law that Ohio has adopted (and that North Carolina conservatives are trying to foist on us).

“Paul Carroll, an 86-year-old World War II veteran who has lived in the same Ohio town for four decades, was denied a chance to votein the state’s primary contests today after a poll worker denied his form of identification, a recently-acquired photo ID from the Department of Veterans Affairs. The poll worker rejected the ID because it did not contain an address, as required by Ohio law.

Carroll told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that he got the ID from the VA after his driver’s license expired because he doesn’t drive anymore…”

You can read the entire story by clicking here.

 

Top of the Morning

The following excellent editorial on mandatory photo ID laws for voting is cross-posted from this morning’s Winston-Salem Journal:

“Voter suppression, typically aimed at racial and ethnic minorities, the poor and women, has a long and sad history in the U.S. Even today, attempts to erect procedural barriers to frustrate voting continue in North Carolina.

House Bill 351, which requires photo identification at the polls, passed the General Assembly but was vetoed by Gov. Bev Perdue in June. It stands only five votes short of a House veto override and then almost certain Senate approval. Read More

Uncategorized

Another weekend “town hall” for House Speaker Thom Tillis, another open mouth, insert foot episode. (Thanks to the intrepid videographers at Progress NC for the link).  

Got that? The Speaker of the North Carolina House is bragging that he passed a far right piece of legislation that he knew would unfairly restrict voting by disabled people and seniors merely as an act of political gamesmanship! 

As in “The Governor doesn’t like this bill?? Well wait till she gets a load of this!” 

What is this —  high school?