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Raleigh will play host to a pair of competing and very different luncheons dealing with public policy this Thursday.

We at NC Policy Watch will be hosting a Crucial Conversation with Kim Bobo, the founder and director of the national advocacy organization, Interfaith Worker Justice. Kim has been named one of Utne Reader‘s “50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Your World” and helped coin the phrase “wage theft” for employer practices that are robbing earned income from millions of Americans. Her book Wage Theft in America helped place the issue on the national radar.Click here for more information.

 Meanwhile, over at the Pope Civitas Institute, folks on the right will be hearing from the boss, himself, Art Pope. Pope has, to our knowledge, never been named anything by Utne Reader, written a book or been called a “visionary” by anyone with any horse sense, but he is clearly well along in a decades-old campaign to enhance the incomes of the state’s top 1%.

We hope you’ll show your support for alternative voices to Pope and the politicians and groups he funds by registering for and attending the Crucial Conversation. Hope to see you there!

 

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Don’t miss our upcoming Crucial Conversation lunches on two important aspects of the 2012 economy…

Event # 1 – Business incentives: Where they work and where they don’t

Join us as Prof. Bill Lester of the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC Chapel Hill unveils an important new study entitled “Mediating Incentives.” According to Lester, there are circumstances in which incentives can work – if we’re smart about where, when and how we pursue them.

When: Thursday September 20 – Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m. and the program will start at 12:00 noon

Click here to register for this event and get more information.

Event # 2 – A talk by Kim Bobo, Founder and Director of the national advocacy organization, Interfaith Worker Justice: How wage theft is undermining the rights of working people Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

With unemployment in North Carolina at 9.6%, policy makers are rightfully focused on ensuring that the state’s economy creates more jobs for Tarheel workers. But as this week’s Prosperity Watch demonstrates, the state also needs to focus on creating better jobs, as well, jobs that pay decent wages and allow workers to support their families. Creating these good jobs would reverse the troubling reality of low-wage job creation seen during the 2000s.  As the new issue points out, North Carolina’s economy lost hundreds of thousands of high-wage jobs from 2001 to 2011, and in their place, saw a boom in low-wage employment instead. What caused this shift from high-wage to low-wage work? For more details, see this week’s Prosperity Watch.

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The N.C. Budget and Tax Center reported recently that while North Carolinians are working harder than ever, most are not reaping the benefits economically. The report points to the “off-shoring” of jobs as a major contributor to soaring income inequality.

Yesterday, Senior Economist John Schmitt of the Center for Economic Policy Research reported similar findings on the national level; American workers are better and more productive than ever.

“The workforce today is more experienced, much better educated, and working with more –and better– capital. Largely as a result, GDP per capita was 63 percent higher in 2010 than it was in 1979.”

Schmitt’s report, however, points to parallel and closely related contributing cause for growing wage and income inequality: the decline in worker bargaining power. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

North Carolinians are working harder than ever before, but the economy doesn’t seem to be working for them. At least, that’s the verdict of a new Budget & Tax Center report, which finds that during the current economic recovery, North Carolina’s workers have increased their productivity and gotten paid less for the first time in 30 years, yet another sign that the current economic recovery is barely living up to its name.  In fact, this productivity gap—in which rising worker productivity is not rewarded with new job creation or higher wages—is one of the most troubling features of the current recovery.

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