Archives

Maybe someone else has already raised this — if so I apologize for missing it — but how come Walter Dalton doesn’t seem to rate an N&O icon?

In the online version of the “Under the Dome ” section of Raleigh’s News & Observer newspaper, numerous politicians have their own little cartoon likenesses.  Bev Perdue, Richard Burr, Kay Hagan, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney (complete with silver sideburns) have little caricature icons. Even Senate leader Phil Berger has one. Pat McCrory’s mug has appeared scores of times to accompany stories about him.

But for some reason, Lt. Governor Dalton doesn’t seem to have one. Maybe I missed it, but a search of dozens of posts mentioning Dalton failed to turn it up.

Anyway, it’s obviously not huge deal, but it does raise at least a small question about the N&O and the balance of its political coverage. Every time a reader goes to Under the Dome these days, he or she has a good chance of seeing Pat McCrory smiling back in what is at least a semi-flattering mug shot. But not so for his opponent, Walter Dalton– a man who’s been a fairly significant political figure for several years.

What gives, N&O?

A state advisory committee wants to see more information on the virtual charter school industry before the state starts funding any of the online schools.

The N.C. E-Learning Commission, which acts in an advisory role to both N.C. Gov. Bev Perdue and the N.C. State Board of Education, met Thursday morning and passed a recommendation that the state board take a closer look at virtual education before approving any cyber schools.

The committee’s recommendation for a detailed cost analysis, curriculum review and accountability assessment of virtual education programs is expected to be in front of the N.C. State Board of Education by June.

“As we go forward with virtual schools, with charters, I think it’s very important that we do it right,” said Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton, the committee chair (and one of several Democratic candidates for governor).

Funding will be a major issue — nothing now prevents a virtual school from getting the same amount of funding as a brick-and-mortar charter school.

Read More