More evidence is mounting everyday that the investment-killer known as TABOR would be disastrous for North Carolina.

Now, NC Women United has compiled a tremendous list of reasons that TABOR will jeopardize the future of NC’s women and families. By imposing artificial spending limits that aren’t related to economic reality, we will miss the chance to build prosperity for everyone in North Carolina. A quick excerpt:

As you may imagine, that is a recipe for a state that will eventually fail all of its citizens, particularly its most vulnerable. This legislation has been introduced in 30 states, and only one – Colorado – has ever fully accepted it and implemented it. And that went so well, the citizens of CO voted to get rid of key pieces of it. …

The state provides a lot of services to everyone; that’s its job.  In particular, it provides services to the most vulnerable citizens that can’t get their needs met in the private market. The for-profit market stays away from certain services – like domestic and sexual violence crisis services, and services to assist the homeless and those experiencing food insecurity –  because there is no real opportunity to make a profit from those services (and also the nature of for-profit business means those businesses may feel more vested in making sure there is a continued need for the product they are selling rather than for solving a social problem). This is why we have a balance between public and private enterprise. TABOR legislation plays on the widespread misunderstanding the public has about how government is funded, and what services the government actually provides to us all (see this chart for an example of the services that may be left out with TABOR in place). These services help not just individuals, but also businesses, who make use of the investments we make in our common good – education, infrastructure, a thriving middle class – to sustain their organizations.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Women will join together at the Bicentennial Mall (near the state legislature) at 5pm today to demand better public policies that would improve the lives of women and families. The rally is part of the North Carolina NAACP’s Moral Monday Movement Summer of Moral Resistance, with support from women’s coalitions such as NC Women United.moralwednesday

Speakers will lift up the fallout from Governor McCrory’s and the state legislature’s policies that have been to the detriment—not the benefit—of Tar Heel women. These policy decisions include the underfunding of education from early education and care to college, shifting taxes away from the wealthy and onto everyone else, failing to expand Medicaid, refusing to give workers the dignity of a minimum wage increase, and enacting the nation’s worst voter suppression law.

Just on the economy issue alone it is easy to see why women will show up tonight and use their voices for change. Women have made tremendous economic strides over the last few decades. Yet, women are still more likely than men to live paycheck to paycheck and struggle to pay the bills.

The fact that women face more economic hardships than men is well-documented in the data. Here are some quick facts from my latest poverty report, North Carolina’s Greatest Challenge, that put Tar Heel women’s economic struggle into perspective:

  • The poverty rate for women in the state was 19.3 percent in 2013 compared to 16.4 percent for men. That year, Tar Heel women earned just 82.9 cents for every dollar men earned.
  • Nearly 156,500 women in the state would have to be lifted out of poverty for women to have the same poverty rate as men.
  • Women of color face particularly high rates of poverty. In 2013, Latina, American Indian, and African American women were more than twice as likely to live in poverty as Asian and white women.
  • Three in four children who were poor lived in families with at least one worker.
  • Gender inequality extends into retirement age too: older female adults are far more likely to struggle to make ends meet than men.

Put simply, from Murphy to Manteo the economy is just downright broken for many women and their families. North Carolina needs policies that create equal opportunity and ensure that prosperity is broadly shared so that all North Carolinians can reach their potential. Yet, the policies that lawmakers are prioritizing are not aligned with the research and fail to meet this standard. Women and allies will join forces tonight to demand better choices to help ensure a better future for us all.

Your silence will not protect you—as Audre Lorde declared. Details are here if you want to join them.

NC Budget and Tax Center

In another sign of an economy that is leaving too many people behind, the share of low-income working families headed by single women is on the rise, suggesting that hard work just isn’t paying off for single mothers–especially African American single mothers. For more details, see the latest issue of Prosperity Watch.


A hat tip to Brent Laurenz at the Center for Voter Education for pointing out this this story from earlier this morning on the GovBeat blog at the Washington Post:

“Voting-rights advocates are pushing a new line of attack on laws that require voters to show identification at the polls: The laws, they say, disproportionately impact women.

There’s anecdotal evidence in Texas, where state Sen. Wendy Davis (D) was among those who had to sign an affidavit before casting her ballot because her voter record didn’t include her middle name (Davis’s likely general election opponent in her bid for governor, Attorney General Greg Abbott, also had to sign an affidavit).

There is also statistical evidence that women are more likely than men to not have valid identification at the polls. That’s because women make up larger shares of just about every one of the sub-groups that are least likely to have a current, valid identification. Here are the groups most likely to be impacted:

The Poor: More than 1 million voters who fall below the poverty line live more than 10 miles away from their nearest identification-issuing office, according to a report by the Brennan Center for Justice. The cost of birth certificates, often required to obtain identification, and the IDs themselves can be a burden; having to travel, and perhaps miss work, is another hurdle to getting an ID. And according to Census data compiled by the National Women’s Law Center, women are more likely to live in poverty than men. The poverty rate among adult women over 18 was 14.6 percent in 2011, compared with 10.9 percent of men.

Seniors: The AARP says as many as one in five seniors lacks a current government-issued photo identification….”

Read the rest of the WaPo story by clicking here.


NC Budget and Tax Center

Disparities in economic opportunity for North Carolina’s workers have persisted for generations, including the last few decades when the state’s economy transformed away from manufacturing employment and toward service employment. These disparities have grown since the Great Recession, according to a newly released State of Working North Carolina report. Although the downturn’s economic pain was pervasive, it was not spread evenly throughout the state. The new report shows that some communities and regions were harder hit than others and continue to struggle with high unemployment and few opportunities for growth.

There are multiple storylines to this “tale of two economies” reality. One is the rural and urban divide. Read More