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NC Budget and Tax Center

As North Carolina continues to recover from the Great Recession, growing more good-paying jobs in the state will require a skilled and educated workforce. As BTC analyst Cedric Johnson writes in the latest issue of Prosperity Watch, an increasing number of jobs are expected to require some level of postsecondary training, and meeting this workforce demand means that a growing number of the state’s public school students must exit the state’s education pipeline prepared to compete in a 21st century economy. And nowhere is this more important than among North Carolina’s lowest income public school students, a growing population that typically needs additional instructional supports to finish high school and enter the workforce fully prepared. See the latest Prosperity Watch for details.

 

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John Schmitt and Milla Sanes have an interesting post on the Center for Economic and Policy Research blog that debunks a bit of common wisdom about the long-term growth in inequality.

Their data show that, overall, the percentage of the workforce working part-time has remained basically stable at around 20% or so.

“Over the last three decades, as economic inequality has been climbing, the overall rate of part-time employment (the top line in the chart) has barely changed….The problem facing workers isn’t a rise in part-time work. The problem is the increasing precarity of full-time work”

In other words, Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center, The State of Working North Carolina

As shown in the recent report on the State of Working North Carolina, many families and workers across the state lost ground during the 2000s.  During this “lost decade,” workers experienced stagnant or falling wage growth, anemic job growth in the recovery from the 2001 recession, and the catastrophic job losses of the Great Recession of 2007-2009.  And in the three years since the formal end of the Great Recession, North Carolina has struggled to make up this lost ground—unemployment remains persistently high, with at least three workers for every available job opening.

In the face of this challenge, policy makers need to promote solutions that address the immediate crisis in employment and establish long-term path for building a sustainable employment base for the industries of the future.

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NC Budget and Tax Center

This blog post is one in a series detailing President Obama’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2013.

In his recently proposed budget for 2013, President Obama reiterated his call for a national commitment to creating an economy “built to last,” an economy capable of providing workers and their families with the opportunity to secure the American Dream. A critical component of this national commitment is the proposed creation of an $8 billion Community College to Career Fund aimed at providing training that leads directly to a job for at least 2 million American workers in high-growth and high-demand industries.

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A new report from the smart folks at NC Budget and Tax Center provides more reasons not to cut post-secondary education:

“RALEIGH (Aug. 16, 2011) – Credentials, or sub-baccalaureate certificates, help improve skill levels of North Carolina workers while also providing a boost to workers’ incomes and the economy at large, a new study finds.

North Carolina’s workforce will require higher educational levels and skills training in the future, a study released this morning by the NC Budget and Tax Center finds, and it is critical that the state maintain its workforce development system in order to deliver this training and education to the state’s workers. According to the study, community colleges, Workforce Investment Act programs, and community-based and apprentice programs all play crucial roles in structuring workforce policy and shaping the lives of North Carolina’s workers.”

You can read the whole report by clicking here.