Archives

Uncategorized

“Harvest of Dignity,” a 30-minute documentary that chronicles the lives of modern farm workers in North Carolina, won a regional Emmy over the weekend in the topical documentary category.

The film updates Edward R. Murrow’s 1960 report, “Harvest of Shame”, and shows that unfortunately, not much has changed about how our country treats the people who work so hard to deliver the bounty of our farms to our grocery stores and our tables.

Donna Campbell of Minnow Media in Carrboro, worked closely with the Farmworker Advocacy Network to make the film. Upon accepting the award in Nashville Saturday, Campbell said she did so on behalf of North Carolina’s farm workers.

“Those of us who haven’t spent 16 hours in a sweet potato field really have no idea what hard work is,” she said (you can watch the awards speech around 01:14 of the Emmy broadcast.

At least 150,000 farm workers and their families are in North Carolina for each growing season, according to the North Carolina Farmworker Institute.  often making less than $11,000 a year. Wage and safety violations are unfortunately all too common, with workers still facing difficulties like pesticide exposure, unacceptable living conditions and rampant wage theft.

The thought-provoking movie is worth watching with a book club or group of friends or neighbors, sure to raise awareness and generate discussion. Watch the movie and download discussion materials here: http://pic.tv/harvest/.

Uncategorized

Liz Schuler, Secretary Treasurer of the AFL-CIO

Some seats still remain for next Monday’s NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation with Liz Shuler, Secretary-Treasuer of the AFL-CIO. Shuler will discuss the ongoing legislative assault on workers and the right to unionize (both in North Carolina and nationally) and what it has meant for American working people.

Don’t miss this important opportunity to hear from this powerful and important voice for working families.

When: Monday, March 4, at 12:30 p.m. — (Note later than usual start – box lunches will be available at 12:15 p.m).

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. at the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets.

Cost: $10 – includes box lunch. Box lunches will be available at 12:15 p.m.

Space is limited – pre-registration required.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com.

Uncategorized

In Kansas, tax reform isn’t exactly playing out the way some lawmakers had hoped.  The state that Grover Norquist once called “the starter gun for tax competition” has passed a series of income tax cuts over the past year with the stated goal of eventually eliminating income taxes altogether in the near future.  This “race to zero” is well underway in several states with conservative governors and legislatures.  Here’s a quick look at how that’s working out so far for Kansas:

A $2.5B budget shortfall

The Kansas Legislative Research Department is projecting a $2.5 billion revenue hole through 2018 because the legislature has yet to figure out an effective way to replace lost revenues as a result of the income tax cuts.

A threatened credit rating

Last month, a state court ruled that the Kansas legislature was breaking the law by underfunding public schools as a result of the income tax cuts, which prompted Moody’s Investors Service to warn of a negative credit risk for the state.

Less funding for public services

Concerns over the state’s credit rating aren’t the only thing that should give Kansans pause.  By starving public schools and other services critical to economic success, the state is jeopardizing future growth. Read More

Uncategorized

change in povertyA new Working Poor Families Project report finds for a fifth consecutive year the number of low-income working families has risen in the U.S., with nearly a third of all working families unable to earn enough to meet their basic needs.

New data show that 10.4 million U.S. working families were low-income in 2011, up from 10.2 million in 2010.

In North Carolina, 36% of the state’s working families were living below 200% of the federal poverty level in 2011 – struggling to cover housing costs, utilities, and child care.

The report notes that children growing up in low-income families have worse health and educational outcomes, and fewer opportunities for upward mobility.working poor

Nationwide, the total number of people that make-up low-income working families stands at 47.5 million. That is roughly equivalent to the total number of residents in California, Oregon, and Washington combined.

The report calls on federal and state policymakers to take actions that strengthen both job growth and job quality, and increase access to educational opportunities.

To read the full report, click here.