Women and the Economy

Another Equal Pay Day without pay equity

Today is Equal Pay Day, a day that marks the wage gap between working women and men. According to the National Committee on Pay Equity, each year Equal Pay Day falls on a Tuesday to illustrate how far into the work week women must work to earn what men earned the previous week. Nationally, women are still paid 77 cents for each dollar earned annually by men – a gap of 23 cents.

Here in North Carolina, working women fare a little better, but not by much. North Carolina’s working women are still only earning 80.7 percent of men’s earnings.

A new fact sheet released today by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research takes a closer look at the wage gap by occupation and finds that a wage gap exists within and between occupations. Male-dominated occupations continue to pay more than female-dominated occupations. And women’s earnings are lower than men’s in almost all occupations, whether they are male or female-dominated. Disturbingly, women are more than two times as likely to work in occupations with earnings less than the federal poverty level.

The National Women’s Law Center recently published a fact sheet on the importance of fair pay for North Carolina women. Learn more here.

 

Check Also

A big picture view of the CBO’s minimum wage report

This week’s release of the Congressional Budget Office ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

A civil rights settlement forced DEQ to sample Duplin County waterways for pollution. The hard part [...]

On Friday the UNC Board of Governors rejected a proposal to return the Silent Sam Confederate monume [...]

They could be paved, mined, jammed with concrete, filled with pollutants like GenX or coal ash: More [...]

Shortly after 10 o’clock yesterday morning, a federal jury in the hog nuisance case Gillis vs. Murph [...]

One can imagine a scenario in which it might be possible to take North Carolina Republican leaders s [...]

The post How the Grinches stole the 9th District appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Fayetteville is my hometown more than any – I was born here to military parents, this is where my gr [...]

It’s long been understood by those who pay attention to public policy debates that the age-old conse [...]