NC Budget and Tax Center

NC’s small business could use a boost

With the sounds of Small Business Saturday in the air, it’s a good time to take stock of how main street businesses in North Carolina have fared over the last several years. The end of the Great Recession certainly improved the prospects for small businesses, but the recovery here in North Carolina has had a decidedly big-business bent. Most small businesses have not seen the level of growth that their larger competitors have enjoyed during the recovery, a clear sign that we have not done enough to help Main Street to prosper.

Small Business Saturday Blog Post - NC Growth by Firm Size 2009-2015

As can be seen to the left, the fastest growth in employment during the recovery has occurred in larger businesses. The biggest businesses (more than 1000 employees) have expanded their collective workforce by more than 15% since 2009, the next largest set of establishments (between 500 and 1000 workers) by almost 12%. In contrast the smallest businesses in North Carolina have struggled to take advantage of the current period of prolonged economic growth.

The growth gap between larger and smaller businesses that we’ve seen in North Carolina has not happened to the same degree in many other states. Large firms have added jobs faster than smaller companies over the last six years nationwide, but the difference in North Carolina is much more pronounced. Growth for the largest US companies was twice that of the smallest, while here in North Carolina the largest companies lapped the smallest group five times.Small Business Saturday Blog Post - NC and US Growth by Firm Size 2009-2015

This imbalance is an economic problem because small businesses are the veins circulating capital through local economies. Owners with roots in a community often source more locally, spend more of their earnings nearby, pay better, and invest in their communities. All of that helps to keep money flowing around and creating jobs. None of this is to denigrate how many large companies can help communities, but when local businesses don’t prosper, growth doesn’t always translate into deeper economic health.

Recent economic results call for a different approach to supporting small businesses. Instead of continuing to focus on cutting the corporate income tax, which mostly helps big companies, we should be plowing more resources into programs that help small businesses get loans, find new customers, and retrain their workers. The General Assembly did take a few steps in the right direction this last session, like appropriating funds to The Support Center which makes loans to small companies. But, particularly compared to the tax breaks lavished on large companies over the last few years, the assistance provided to small businesses has not been up to scratch.

So when you hit the shopping trail this season, head to your local small businesses first, particularly if they pay their workers well, offer benefits, and are invested in your community. Big box stores have their place, and some are good corporate citizens, but it’s the small businesses in North Carolina that could use a boost.

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